Tuesday, April 24, 2012

OpenLinkNight: There goes the neighborhood

Street Art Festival, Richmond, VA

Earlier today i read an article on the cannibal
cult in Brazil that made empanadas
of a woman then gave them away
or sold them to neighbors

& if you want to really know yours,
secure an invitation to dinner, and rifle
their medicine cabinet

but don't let the water run
too long, masking the rattle of pills,
as you read the labels, or they will
figure out what you are doing

there is security in knowing they
are medicated, if metal, and in the knowledge
you need to wash your hands more frequently
after perusing that tube of rash creme

(And before you judge, you know
you have done it too---as they have to you---
right now you're wondering
what's in mine, oh---i'm not telling---
come over)

you can never be too careful
our kids play little league together,
have sleep-overs and we tell jokes by the fences
with false laughter---hahahaha.

ha.

this is unreliable though, because who isn't
on something these days---we are not that
much different

instead, i excuse myself from the dinner table,
slip out the back door, find your chairs---
the ones on the veranda or in the middle
of the yard & sit in them

this way i can see what you saw,
what you choose in the placing
to let your eyes fall upon and what not,
is the sun at your shoulder or in your face,
where are the flowers & where are the ashes---wait,
is that---

Worse yet, is to find no chairs,
Imagining the cannibals behind the walls
of their making, carving the last pound
of their own flesh, as thin as they can
to keep from starving

Tonight, let's forgo the games,
get the tooth picks, top drawer next
to the stove, & glue, lots of glue---

We'll build furniture, a table, some chairs
& find the perfect place to sit,
together, enjoying---new views.

OpenLinkNight @ dVerse Poets - time to write something poetic and come join the flash mob of verse---we have been waiting on you. Smiles. Doors open at 3 pm DST.

123 comments:

kaykuala said...

First again? - #1

Hank

kaykuala said...

"and we tell jokes by the fences
with false laughter---hahahaha"

Typical of good neighborliness. Chatting over the fence. But sadly it's a thing of the past. Blame it on the internet. Chatting in cyberspace is the in-thing now!

Hank

Crystal Jigsaw said...

"who isn't on something these days.." not many I would imagine, lol.

CJ x

Mama Zen said...

I love the whole idea of going outside to see what they see!

Sage said...

After your opening lines, all I can say is I am glad lunch is still two hours away! And spying on neighbors...

Mary said...

Rifling medicine cabinets at other people's homes...I've heard that people do that! With my luck, the pill bottles would clatter into the sink, and everyone would know what I was doing.

Cannibal empanadas - yikes.

Seeing new views -- I'm all for that! That's one thing I like about reading your poetry.

Magpie said...

Another trip into the warped mind of Brian...bwawawa. Such a mind to think to sit in their chairs to see what they see. Twisted thinking, but oh, so fun.

ayala said...

Brian..love this...this way i can see what you saw,
what you choose in the placing
to let your eyes fall upon and what not,
is the sun at your shoulder or in your face,
where are the flowers & where are the ashes---wait,
is that--

You are a sponge that absorbs all the life around you, and you bring it to us in this and other well penned thoughts.

Tara Miller said...

Interesting twist today, love. To some extent, everyone wears a mask in front of others but it's when we completely trust and feel safe being vulnerable that we can or want to take that mask off.

Your words today had that creepy kind of Hannibal Lecter feel to it...don't know why; just did. :)

Claudia said...

nice..i like sitting in other people's chairs and try to see what they see, try to understand their point of view and i much like the part of building furniture together as well-- together instead of against each other-- the water trick is really helpful by the way...so when i rifle someone's medicine cabinet next time, i may not get caught so quickly...smiles..nice..really like it bri

Myrna R. said...

"We are not that much different"
So true. And we judge each other, and if only we did sit in each other's chairs maybe we'd realize that we're actually all on something.

Great write.

Laurie Kolp said...

you can never be too careful
our kids play little league together,
have sleep-overs and we tell jokes by the fences
with false laughter---hahahaha.

ha.

this is unreliable though, because who isn't
on something these days

... I can relate to that. I hate all that fakiness. Very powerful piece, Brian.

I stepped out of my comfort zone (b/c of a challenge)for today's dVerse posting...

manicddaily said...

Really very clever today. You are a fount-- hard to keep up with. This one flows like the water in that tap - but uncovers rather than covers. And I do like the generosity at the end--helping to build a spot to sit together. (Hopefully not in front of a computer!) K.

ladyfi said...

Oh, this is just beautiful!

CiCi said...

Snooping and enjoying it. In my younger years, couples did that at each others homes. Looking in medicine cabinets, not empanadas. Why, I have no idea. Nosy I guess.

lifeisaroadtrip said...

I have to say that I have never looked in anyone's medicine cabinet, closet or under their bed. I guess I'm thinking about karma, hoping they will stay out of mine!

Natasha Head said...

My mama warned me about folks like you! Actually, she taught me, when expecting company, to hide everything, because people will be people and they just can't help themselves. So needless to say I've built a lovely little home out of boxes that lock up tight...doesn't mean I won't share secrets when sitting on Adirondacks if the view is just right.

chromapoesy.com said...

Is the sun in their eyes? That's such a compassionate way to express the struggles we each face. I always end up with the neighbors that get hauled away by plain clothed government enforcers so they don't tend to invite me over for dinner (thankfully).

Sue said...

Can't say I have any interest in people's medicine cabinets, but I do like the idea of sitting in someone's chair to see what it is he or she looks at every day. And placement would indeed be important.

I guess I do that pretty often, figuratively. People interest me, and the best way to understand them is to imagine being them. Our mom taught us this. (A great side effect is how much easier acceptance and forgiveness become.)

=)

Brian Miller said...

true that sue...i think in some way we are all voyeurs of what is going on around us...watching the neighbor out the window, maybe not rifling the med cab...but i know plenty who have...we are not that much different, not as much as we pretend we are....smiles.

Daniel said...

Kind of along the lines of me judging others but hating to be judged myself.

mrs mediocrity said...

i love the way you weave these words between friends and cannibals... fabulous dichotomies, the ordinary played off against the rare.
and i think you are so right, sitting where they sit is a much better way to see what they see.

Edd Writer said...

Yum... tastes like chicken ...BURRP! Excuse me ! *_*

hedgewitch said...

I think the word delicious is perhaps the wrong one--yet the assembly of images and thoughts in this one is pretty damn tasty, bri--we're all on something, and what's in my cabinet is none of your business. I can tell a lot more from where you look and what you choose to see. The image of cannibals eating their own flesh to the bone is a stunning use of metaphor here. Great work, boss.

Daydreamertoo said...

OMgoodness. I've never checked anyon'es medicine cabinet... maybe I should! LOL
False laughter by the fence just about says it all. You are always so perceptive, right on the nail! :)

poemsofhateandhope.com said...

I read about this cult...totally crazy....just bonkers....I think what your poem does is hint at the 'undercurrents' in our lives- some people certainly have sides to them that we just don't know about, or ever see, and sometimes,mitts in the most normal of places, the most normal of people, - look at Dennis Nielsen, or many of the serial killers that have gained notoriety- to some- perfectly normal people, to their victims , crazed bloodthirsty killers- guess we never know who really lives next door to us....maybe I don't want to know....great write- thought provoking, uncomfortable, great

Fred Rutherford said...

That cannibal story is unreal, even today wow. The idea of the medicine cabinet is neat, everyone is on something these days aren't they. Really makes you think how well you know people. Great write. Thanks

Sub-Radar-Mike said...

Cannibals, little league, and street art all in the same post... only at the waystation one haha.

California Girl said...

What an extraordinary way to describe those well-meaning neighbors with whom you have so much in common.

I wouldn't want to live next door.

Ouch!


P.S. Love the street scene photo from Richmond. I think I recognize the tunnel...is it downtown near the financial area?

Goat said...

Nice. Hard to relate cannibalism to anything, but the medicine cabinet is awesome.

Anonymous said...

"this way i can see what you saw,
what you choose in the placing" ... That is a very original and likely effective way of looking at life from someone else's perspective.

Love empanadas, particularly squash. Not people, though.

Reggie makes me take vitamins. Other than that, I only take migraine pills. Don't even have a medicine cabinet. :)

rosemarymint.wordpress.com

poemblaze said...

Excellent poem. We rummage through each others' lives, and if we are honest, find ourselves.

pandamoniumcat said...

We never really know people...behind closed doors hide all their secrets... It's why parents worry so much these days...I know I do! Nice Write!

Linda Kruschke said...

Hmmm. I hope I don't have any cannibals living in the neighborhood, though I used to have a mentally unstable young man living in the house behind us who threw R-rated movies over the fence for my 10-year-old son. I wouldn't have wanted to sit in his chair and see his perspective. Peace, Linda

Joseph Hesch said...

Yeah, welcome to the 'burbs, Brian. Though I had some quite interesting neighbors in the city, too.

Great piece of the life we live. Even with cannibals next door.

majjellica said...

Hi,
This was a very insightful poem, and this alarming thing at the back of our minds makes us vigilant.I enjoyed this very much.

EMK said...

Long time no see. :) This is a nice one, Brian! Enjoyed it!

zongrik said...

Anthony's is also gruesome (you're stanza 3 is very gruesome) is today gruesome day?

Blue Flute said...

Deliciously bizarre opening. Well, maybe "delicious" is the wrong word choice given the subject...

Steve E said...

I agree with Ayala, who (above) called you a "...sponge that absorbs all the life around you..."

I was always called "the old soak.." Never knew what it meant--grin!

I DO know that when I'd soaked up enough, I felt verrrry neighborly! Then, when I spoke English to my Spanish neighbors, they thought it was Greek!

BRIAN...YOU DA MAN!
Blessings

Anthony Desmond said...

mhm seems like everyone is on a lil sumin... love the idea of seeing new views..

Gerry Snape said...

Now I think on every time I buy meat in our local market...because the butcher is...Mr. Sweeney!! thankyou for this enlightened posr and of course super poem.

Liz @ A Nut in a Nutshell said...

We're all medicated in some fashion or other.

Bradley Howington said...

Written so perfectly - I love it! Nice flow. :)

Raivenne said...

Forget what's in your wallet! What's in your medicine cabinet?!! Your mind doth dwell in so interesting place Sir. It makes a Raivenne wonder exactly where do you sit and what do you see? LOL

Intriguing pen, Brian. I likes it.

Elizabeth Young said...

We never know what's going on at the neighbours house do we?! Similarly, they never know what's going on at ours, and you can't be too careful brother.

happygirl said...

I admit it. I've peeked in the medicine cabinet. It's interesting to think about seeing myself as I'm seen. :)

Mary Mansfield said...

Hmm, makes you wonder who's lurking behind the neighbor's curtains, whether it's the typical busybody or some deranged serial killer. Nice write.

Arron Shilling said...

this is darkly cool... i new i was going to like it the minute we had cannibals! lol - ... love the development brian and where you took the piece;

i still refuse to take my meds! - lol (can you tell:)

the culmination and channeling of the whole shebang in the final 3 stanzas is excellent.

great write bri :

Short poems said...

I like each and every poem you write.The words,the feelings behind them...everything is just so awesome!

Take care
Marinela

moonlitpoetic said...

yay such a rollercoaster of poetic lines. enjoyed the trip, as always ~smile

Adura Ojo said...

So many layers, Brian. Perfect delivery....jokes on the fence with false laughter...hahahaha. I'm still laughing. True though.

vivinfrance said...

Hand on heart, I have never looked in anyone's bathroom cabinet.
You let me quite a merry dance here, Brian - a voyage of discovery that it would never have entered my head to undertake! Boy, am I glad I did.

missing moments said...

Powerful words today and rings of truth ... love the line "we tell jokes by the fences with false laughter" ... do we every really know our neighbors?? Think not. But I do at times enjoy looking at the world from their patio.

rosaria williams said...

This is new territory for you,if I'm not mistaken. Human foibles, plenty of meat on those bones.

Edward said...

third from last stanza is worth admission alone...for me this is a sublime look at what walls a soul, of what we cask into the ripening of lifeblood with toil, and often enough we shine a Sun from dusted off regard inside us, with these poems, these expressions, that find a creative fissure or filamental exit behind the peel of wallpaper thin, that just might decide to stay for dinner and be surprised by how our eyes are mirrored here in a dark scry for more of what makes us tick or keeps us from getting sick...love the conversational sway rhythm of the piece...

Marie Nicole said...

I love the extra "ha" you added for good measure. Besides a fake laugh always ends with a single solitary ha that wonders what it's doing out there all alone...

De said...

Love this.
Brian, I find each of your writings to be such an amazing journey down the page. I'm always so glad to be along for the ride.

Susie Clevenger said...

We smile and say "Not me" and then crawl into our medicine cabinets of pills and booze..very insightful piece. Yes, let us build new furniture and by all means check out a new view...this is a fantastic piece!

1emeraldcity said...

Brian this is very funny and very honest. We are all voyeurs, to one degree or another. I love to watch people watch people. And frankly if someone leaves their curtains open, I'm gonna look. Love this poem! hahahahahaha!

Who Is Afraid Of Miss Lovett? No, Mrs.Lovett... said...

"& if you want to really know yours,secure an invitation to dinner, and rifle their medicine cabinet"
and
"We'll build furniture, a table, some chairs & find the perfect place to sit,together, enjoying---new views."

Hi! Brian...
It seems as if your poem took me in 2 different directions Of...Neighbors and the way that we [may] view each other in this world.
Tks, for letting me ponder [your poetic words]and for sharing the image too!
deedee ;-)

PattiKen said...

Oh, come on... Every one of us who fancies ourselves a poet or a writer or even a photographer is continually looking in our neighbor's "medicine cabinet." It sounds better to call ourselves "students of the human condition," but really? We're Nosey Parkers, every one.

Laura said...

"this way i can see what you saw,
what you choose in the placing
to let your eyes fall upon and what not,
is the sun at your shoulder or in your face,
where are the flowers & where are the ashes"

wow!

Betsy said...

On a funny note...one time I was using someone's bathroom and there wasn't any toilet paper. I had to search all the cupboards for a new roll. Every single door and drawer made a loud screech! All I could think about was the noise I was making and how utterly snoopy they must have thought I was! I was mortified. And wouldn't you know the tp was in the last place I looked? Geesh.

We live in a very small town...and community knit together by a university and a church. It's def a glass bubble. Sometimes that's great and sometimes not so much.

We actually planted trees in the back to block the neighbor's view. They stood at their kitchen window and watched us...not just a glance out, but a long watch. Then the next time we saw them, they would comment on what we had been doing! We put a whole row on pine trees along the property line and they complained! hahaha.

Zouxzoux said...

Smart social commentary on how we judge others, what we actually see and what we perceive to be true. I like how you brought everyone together in the ending with an invitation to start again with a new perspective. Awesome write.

Ginny Brannan said...

I don't check out medicine cabinets-- at least not since my son was little and I worried what he could get into, but I do check out photos, clutter, trash (empty bottles) left in full view to try to get a handle on the type of people they really are. So yeah, I know I've done it too!! As always Brian, grasping a moment and telling it like it is. Good write!!

Pauline said...

You can never be too careful, and you never really know your neighbors... and the medicine cabinet won't tell you about cannibals :(

Marbles in My Pocket said...

The neighbor behind me saw me in the backyard when I first moved in. "Buy the house?" he asked. "Renting, for now," I said. He huffed, like that really disgusted him, then went in the house. He hasn't said a word to me since. Dang low-life renters.

PoppySilverUK said...

This includes so many things that have blown my mind! Totally surreal piece but not without a vivid message, one that sways through the mind as I re-read....second reading gets me so consumed...great pace and imagery....through the eyes of others...what a thrilling piece of work and what an unsettling balance to it...perfection...love it!!! xoxo

1emeraldcity said...

Had a feeling my 1st comment didn't register. So here I am again. Voyeurism is nothing new, but you are damn honest and funny. I love to watch people watching people. And if someone leaves their curtains open, I'll look. Fun to sit in those chairs and wonder what other ppl. thought who sat in them. Good stuff. lol !

Grace said...

I specially like sitting and seeing what the view is from the other side, and see it from their perspective. And ending of new views...hopeful note ~

Sharp Little Pencil said...

The POV is what it's all about, Brian. Glad you're hosting dverse this week. Excellent poem, and the laughter followed by the single

ha

extremely effective. Had a fajita dinner planned; changing mind now... Good neighbors can be deceiving. The chat is usually behind your back. Peace, Amy
http://sharplittlepencil.com/2012/04/23/was-a-time-when/

Rosemary Nissen-Wade said...

You always surprise me! (And I love that your poems are unpredictable.) And then, when I have digested what you say, it seems so perfectly right. :)

Secret Agent Woman said...

Cannibals. You've effectively creeped me out!

turtlememoir said...

yeah, let's... all those silly games humans play that keep them pitted against one another when they could be doing things together, on the same side

Glenn Buttkus said...

Only a brave poet would work so hard to get to know the neighbors. This piece has the marvelous Miller twists that hop from mundane to macabre, and I love it.
Curiosity is essential for poets, but remember how it turned out for the cat.

Damyanti said...

Hmmm... that opening line got me!

Fireblossom said...

There's a movie called, I think, "Arlington Drive" with Tim Robbins and one of the Bridges, which really sets this idea of who your neighbors are on its ear. Good movie.

colleen said...

Nice mix of horror and whimsy. I like the way the story unfolds. What goes on behind closed doors?

henry clemmons said...

Our cannabalistic society, a strange brew of community. Very excellent write.

Pat Hatt said...

Getting rid of the net
Isn't such an easy bet
As most stay in
And not go out to look which is a sin
Cannabils too
That is just eww
Cults are quite crazy
I have nothing in a medicine cabinet to make ones eyes go hazy
And yes cream would surely make me wash very well
Then my ocd would send me away with some excuse I tell
Slow today
As blogger causes dismay
Hunk of junk
Is in a funk

momto8 said...

we all share a common humanity.

Andrew Kreider said...

Guess we're both working on the neighborhood this week. Love the medicine cabinet rifling!

Buddah Moskowitz said...

Wonderful, my brother - you're welcome to peruse my medicine cabinets anytime. If you were my neighbor, I'm sure we'd hang all the time. Great write!

Hannah said...

WOW, Brian, you never fail to surprise me with "new views," your poetic voice is so diverse! Thanks for this!

flaubert said...

Brian, this is so good. Thanks.

Pamela
I am struggling to finish napowrimo, ugh! You make it look so easy.

Beth Winter said...

Actually, a toothpick chair and a view from another's eyes sounds like a perfect way to round out the day. I don't have a medicine cabinet (thank goodness) although I heard someone once say that she could tell how affluent people really were by looking for frayed towels in the linen closet. I don't have a linen closet either. Wonderful, Brian. :)

marousia said...

Vivid piece

Syd said...

I have to say that I don't have enough curiosity to rifle through someone's medicine cabinet. But I like to have a good comfortable chair to sit in--now that is an important item when visiting others.

Lisa Golden said...

Looking through the medicine cabinet is something I've never done. I don't know why - I guess I never thought of it. Damn.

Ravenblack said...

I don't know my neighbors and I don't really want to know them. We only smile when we meet along the corridors. It's a cold city attitude that keeps us safe from potentially odd types when everyone is already nearly too close for comfort.

Really like this urban piece. Expanded on the thoughts from this poem, we don't really know what makes up the people around us. Details are put in like furniture into a house until we are invited. Still I would probably turn down a sudden invitation from a neighbor I don't know, as if avoiding a suspect cannibal. :D

Semaphore said...

Two sayings came to mind as I read your poem. The first "Never judge a man until you walk a mile in his shoes" came to mind you described rifling through neighbors' medicine cabinets, and sitting on their patio chairs. And the second, which is an antithesis of your poem but in a way supports it, is Frost's immortal observation: "Good fences make good neighbors." Well done.

Anonymous said...

"i think in some way we are all voyeurs of what is going on around us"

And the less we talk, the more we can observe.

rosemarymint.wordpress.com

Quotes,Photos and a little Poetry said...

A new is sometimes always good, and can clam a storm in someone if needs be. I like your point of view (sometimes:)
http://leah-jamielynn.typepad.com/blog/

The Empress said...

Getting chewed up alive, figuratively or literally.

I feel it here.

Liked this, brian. Liked it so much.

beckykilsby said...

Love your way into this question Brian.. yes, how do we know people?

That false laughter is still ringing (true)... ha

oceangirl said...

..but here is where I want to be. Love the way you bring in the conversation.

Apryl Gonzales Sweet said...

powerful imagery! I know we forget to carve out for ourselves the opportunity to see beyond our selves sometimes.

Love this:

this way i can see what you saw,
what you choose in the placing
to let your eyes fall upon and what not,
is the sun at your shoulder or in your face,
where are the flowers & where are the ashes

well done, as usual ;)

Kamana said...

the first lines made me go eww... and dropped my sandwich back onto my plate.


love the false laughter. so true!

Valerie said...

I don't sit in other people's chairs but I admit to being a surreptitious window gazer. Other than that I'm not at all curious......

irene said...

You made us go out of our comfort zone alright. I like that hahaha bit and that sitting out on the chair enjoying the view bit. Nice work, Brian.

welshstream said...

This is a fine piece of work ... love the line 'this way i can see what you saw' ..... putting ourselves in other people's places give us such a wonderfully different perspective on life, sadly not many people do that.

Aidz Giannini said...

No need to sit in their chairs just pluck their eyeballs out n stare through them while wearing their skin

Lilu said...

Well aren't you the clever one...
Cannibalism. One never knows what the neighbor is up to. Got to be sure never to accept empanadas from the neighbor ~_^
You're making me like your mind more and more, mister.
I also like sitting in other people chairs and trying to see what they saw.
And I suppose we're all digging into each others' lives to find some sort of clue that tells us someone else has it as bad as us and that we're not alone in our struggles. We've all done it, to make ourselves feel better, haven't we?
Love this write. Great work, Brian =)

James Rainsford said...

A timely reminder to always tidy all drawers and cabinets before guests arrive.

Dave King said...

I, too read of this. We seem to have had a lot of reports of modern day cannibals in various parts of the world just recently - but the empanadas... Ugh!

Ruth said...

This is full of a beautiful sense of community, of trust, in the end. We can eat each other alive. But I find that if I spend one hour with a person I have mistrusted, judged, or otherwise maligned, I usually "get them".

the walking man said...

Please Brian feel free to peruse our medicine bag and war chest, there you will find nothing of who or what we are. I keep my drugs in my pocket, never leave home without them, my personal american express.

But do come sit on the backyard bench enjoy the view day or night the sun will never blind you and the moon casts a soft glow when the darkness of the warming air doesn't cover us.

SueAnn Lommler said...

This reminded me of a co-worker who didn't have the best hygiene. She was really dirty...but when we went to her house...it was spotless and even her medicine cabinet and drawer were shiny clean.
Weird where you take me...Ha
Hugs
SueAnn

Charles Miller said...

That's a shocking story about the cannibal cult, bizarre and horrifying. A good analogy though for the state of our relationship to our neighbors in America. Some of the worst things happen, like you say, and the weird hatreds that go on and simmer for years is trult scary. But you have it right too about the secret desires and things that people do and don't let others see. Do we really know others, or ourselves for that matter? As the book says, look at the plank in your own eye before bemoaning the splinter in your neighbor's eye. Excellent poem.

joanna said...

the cannibal opening is a perfect comparison. and i like the checking out of chairs, examining literally the perspective-- so much more telling than opening medicine cabinets. *smiles* kinda glad i don't have patio furniture (or indeed, a patio)

Josh Hoyt said...

Well you hit me with the empanadas. It brought back the good old days when I would by a pound on the streets of Brazil. I wonder what they really put in them....

Lady Nyo said...

Any one who starts a poem with the word 'cannibal' has my attention!

LOL!...I don't know what to think!

Brian, this is another one of your excellent poems...urban, suburban, whatever! It doesn't matter! Excellent, topical and really edgy.

But I have drug dealer grandmother next to my house, and we don't talk....ever. And we couldn't reach over the fence (8 feet high with the damn ivy) to talk anyway.

We come from very differnet cultures, and her grandchildren (very grown men) have brought the plague to our very beautiful street 15 years ago.

I think I would perfer cannibals.

Lady Nyo

Aaron Kent - twoinformalfeet.blogspot.com said...

"and we tell jokes by the fences
with false laughter---hahahaha"

False laughter and a suspicious eye.

Love this curious piece about the fact that you never quite know those around you, no matter how deep you delve.

Mystic_Mom said...

This is good Brian. Humor and commentary and some snacks too, if you are cannibal enough to enjoy them!

Chris Lawrence said...

Brilliant how the neighborhood goes

Uneven Stephen said...

Ha, great write. We all have our secrets and pill bottles in medicine cabinets. Great message.

Samantha Webb said...

We'll build furniture, a table, some chairs
& find the perfect place to sit,
together, enjoying---new views.

...I like that. I like to rifle too :)

wayside word garden said...

Wow, great stuff. We aren't all that different.
I love this:
"...and we tell jokes by the fences
with false laughter---hahahaha.

ha."

That little "ha" by itself speaks volumes.

Ed Pilolla said...

the empanada lady got my attention:) i also like sitting in chairs and waiting and watching and wondering. something about that image that was quite moving and powerful. building the furniture is also strong. the uncertainness of the being parents who look like anyone else added fuel to my intrigue. genuine laughter i'm left thinking about too...

adeeyoyo said...

Oy, Brian, you have given me the creeps. We never know REALLY what goes on in other people's houses - maybe just as well...

Chris said...

I've noticed in the news that they're still saying "alleged" and "suspected". Sure hope it turns out not to be true. Ugh.

Love your idea of going outside to sit in a chair to find the view the neighbor was seeing. Very nice. We should all try to see things from the others' points of view.

C Rose said...

This was quite the write Brian...I have never looked in someone's cabinet, but now I feel weird that I hadn't! Always enjoy where you take the craft! ~ Rose