Tuesday, January 31, 2012

OpenLinkNight: Sequences & Ratios II

A. Bogen

They press papers in my hand
before we pile on the elevator

for identification, in case
i am stopped, and i am to memorize them
because they are me, now
and they will know if i can't LIvE
up to them

Dejan Dusan Popovic,
born March 1, 1897
in Surcin, Yugoslavia
a doctor of Obstetrics-Gynecology

The walls are steel. Hard. Pitted. Stained.
Everything is hard here in a building three stories
tall telling millions of stories, telling
one story,

Starred arms and Marked stores,
protested for the measurement of a man,
charts of eye color, tassels of hair held
to match, calipers for the nose
all to determine your worth, unless
of course you were homosexual, jewish
or handicapped, they were---

hate. hatE. HAtE.

on a train car now, which carry them
to the ghetto, all packed in pressing against
and sweating, i smell them, their bodies
i smell them, even holding my breathe,
even when---

the furnace where they burn the bodies
after the gas, and i can no longer move
and there is no bench, just a chain to cling
as my legs give way and weep, i---

taste their ash on the back of my throat,
the heat, and every wall has eyes, hundreds
of them staring at me, asking questions---

Dejan Dusan Popovic, mArch 1st,
YugoslaviA, one of nine childreN, I
just need to sit, but there is no bench,
and each corner is taken by ghosts in black
&white pictures, flesh defining bone structures,
caricatures of living death
with eyes, eyes, I can't count high enough to add
up all, but I know 1.5 million children, 1.5 mil-
lion children and how many more---

i

no one is saying a word, language lost for what
we ArE
experiencing, reading, watching like a rApe,
our eyEs stapled oPen and can't look away & i
am sTucK in the secoNd act, before saLvaTion beCaUse
no one KnowS itS cominG, we doIn reTro but
theY muSt not haVe

it is tOO muCh, mAke it StOp


because i am beyond numb
             and feeling every thing

everything is HARD here
i smell their bodies
i taste their ash
i am Dejan Dusan Popovic, Yugoslavia
          (i keep walking)
they break my legs, my hands, gouge my eyes
          (parts of me will never leave this museum)
and skin me alive and i live like that
         (taste, smell, weep, weep--)
for nearly a year, before they
hang me

weep

OpenLinkNight @ dVerse Poets - We write poetry and then come together and celebrate verse. Go write something. Or just drop in to enjoy the people and listen for a bit. Doors open at 3 pm EST.

This is part II in a series on my day in DC last Saturday. Have at least one more day in me, maybe two.

121 comments:

Heaven said...

*cries*

JANU said...

So raw and deep. Touching.

Birdie said...

thank you for bringing up the topic Brian, it's so easy to forget when we live in places with a 'relative' peace ...
my granddad was at the 'forced work' in Germany & our family friend was taken to the camp in Germany when she was 17, all her family was killed, she has been beaten up on her head (and is deaf on one ear as result) since she was trying to stand for an old lady when they were forced to work in the camp ... i noticed that people who lived through horrors like that very often don't like to talk about it much...& it takes time for them to start, when my granddad talked with our family friend they both cried, i never saw my granddad to cry but that one moment ... it's so important to understand that we are all one (and that's not just a sentence) that we are perfect in our differences and that hate creates more hate pain and suffering which is so pointless!

the walking man said...

I tried to warn you Brian.

Yet this is humanity, insane with hate, humbled at the barrel of a gun and dead for no reason other than you are not like me and I have power to kill you so i will use it.

At times there is power to hardness of heart--try to remember that the next time you find yourself in a victim shoes.

Daniel said...

A tough subject to get near because I think it is still such a raw place. Oh what we as a people can endorse or be complicit with or support or carry out with our own hands ...

manicddaily said...

The close is especially strong. Terrible. It makes so upset that people pay so little attention now, don't even know. K.

Natasha Head said...

Brian...the sadness that poured from the picture you chose was bad enough...then add the fire of your words. You bring all senses on board perhaps most importantly, that sixth one, you know...the knot in your gut that forces you to admit no matter how many gadgets and gizmos you surround yourself with, we all come from this history, in some form or another, and as humans, the atrocities we are capable of can put the fear of ALL gods into your bones. This was a chilling start to my morning poet, and can't say some of that helplessness won't find it's way to my pen.

Robert Gibson said...

*I'm shaking*

blinking back tears....

Oh
My
God

*gasping for breath*

Jesus Christ ... that ... that ....

*speechless*

but then again, you said it best:

"because i am beyond numb
and feeling every thing"

Shell said...

......

Lorraine said...

That Hell lived on earth for a while destroys everything .Love, respect have to stand up and never ever sit down again...so many tears inside

Stuart McPherson said...

This is HARDCORE. I absolutely loved this- so raw- pure raw emotion. The way it is written is beautiful- and just gets across this sense of desperation, of disbeleif, of sadness. Brian- this is my facourite piece ive seen of yours- so difficult to get across the horror of this subject-and the feelings it creates in those of us who are human- and those of us who are less so. Massive congrats- this blew me away

Pat Hatt said...

Wow, held nothing back this time
So true our life is pretty much based on some sort of crime
Amazing how much the so called higher beings have gotten to where we are
With this kind of crap near and far
Yet it seems we never learn
Just get better at hiding it as the clock continues to turn

Ténèbres à la lumière... said...

"because i am beyond numb
and feeling every thing"


Hi! Brian...
A [good] friend sent me a copy Of this film and I cried and reflected...
[after watching the film]
"Nuit et brouillard" (Night and Fog) part 1/3"

...and now I just read your beautiful, but yet very haunting poetry and I have cried and reflected once again.

Thanks, for sharing your experience in [your]beautiful, moving and poetic words.

Ténèbres à la lumière... said...

One more thing Brian...I was pondering whether to add this warning and not going against my better judgement I have decided to post this
Warning:
Night and Fog, also know as Nuit et brouillard in French is a short film directed by Alain Resnais,
produced by Anatole Dauman, written by Jean Cayrol, narrated by Michel Bouquet, music by Hanns Eisler, and edited by Jasmine Chasney and Henri Colpi.

It was distributed by Argos Films and first released in 1955 in France. This video contains real pictures and video from the Holocaust, and may be graphic to younger viewers. Those with a weak heart are not advised to watch. This 32 minute movie is completely in French and contains English subtitles.

This is an important film which displays the cruelty and brutality, but also secrecy and calculation of the Einsatzgruppen, SS, and Nazis ordered under Adolf Hitler as Chancellor.

*Warning for any young viewers who could have second thoughts: Nudity and mass graves of visible corpses lie ahead.*

DJan said...

I watched SHOA because I felt I had to understand the Holocaust. I don't understand. I read this poem and it hit deep inside. I don't understand. I will never understand it.

SueAnn said...

I weep, weep, weep!
Hugs quietly
SUeAnn

Mary Mansfield said...

Such a powerfully written poem! I think even though it's so emotionally wrenching to reflect on the horrors that humans are capable of, it's important to do so in hopes that we can learn to recognize the signs of encroaching evil and do all we can to take a stand against it.

freeclarke said...

Very few poems have ever made me sob out loud. Yours joins the list, Brian. The way you used language and repetition to paint the starkest of pictures about this human atrocity speaks to the very soul of me. I was wrenched open on a Tuesday morning. Thanks.
Excellent work my friend.

The Silver Fox said...

"(parts of me will never leave this museum)"

It's sad that a museum like this even needs to exist, but it does. Certain things need to be proven to the cynics and skeptics, in hopes that they can be avoided in the future.

But who knows if they will be.

Heather said...

tears....

Tabor said...

With the anger in the current world as people demand a more fair shake in the world, I often wonder how far we are from returning to this with a different mask.

Brian Miller said...

i am glad you ask that tabor...it is an important question...

and i am glad i went...it was hard WM and yes you warned me...and walking in i remembered your warning...honestly i think everyone should visit it once...it will be a long time before i go back...

i even left out the shoes...all the shoes just covering the floor...ugh...

Magpie said...

Heartbreaking...

Anonymous said...

Oh Brian. You made me feel it, especially here:

"i am Dejan Dusan Popovic, Yugoslavia
(i keep walking)
they break my legs, my hands, gouge my eyes
(parts of me will never leave this museum)
and skin me alive and i live like that
(taste, smell, weep, weep--)
for nearly a year, before they
hang me"

~Shawna
rosemarymint.wordpress.com

Laurie Kolp said...

I like how you put yourself in their shoes... I felt there, too... love 'every wall has eyes'...

Valerie said...

You knocked the stuffing out of me with this, Brian. And it all could happen again if we're not careful.

Birdie said...

thank you for stopping by Brian, i forgot to mention that the way your wrote the post is brilliant but i thought i was obvious :-)
the story of that lady, our family friend is full of love, she has been saved by the end of the war by an american soldier, she had no family left, no place where to go, he asked her 'do you want to come with me?' she said yes! they got married and were together till her american soldier-saver-lover-husband & father of their two children died few years back, she lives in VA and soon will be 90 years old ... i thought i may share the rest as well ... have a nice week Brian!

Birdie said...

sorry for the mistake i meant to say
'i though IT was obvious' ... typing too fast ... lol

CiCi said...

Oh my. Better to know truth and remember reality than stuff it away and pretend such horror did not happen.

wolfsrosebud said...

too SAD 4 WORDS

ayala said...

Brian, a great capture. My heart was weeping as I was reading. I was reliving how I felt when I was there. I cried for humanity...I cried for family members that were murdered and I remembered my father as a young boy...just like Daniel's story at the museum and his pain and and I also thought of the human spirit that overcame such horror. A great write.

Claudia said...

tears again..for dejan...for six million people with a name and a story and for our weakness... this is masterfully done brian..you made me see, feel and smell him, standing next to him and the lines blurred..

Sue said...

The anguish experienced is unimaginable.
And unspeakable.
Which is why it needs art like this to bring it home.
So people will remember.

Thanks, Brian.

(i need to go to washington dc)

Mama Zen said...

It is beyond my imagining.

JeannetteLS said...

Thank you for this. Thank you.

RD said...

I went as well and cried and stared in abject disbelief, then SHE approached me and asked if I had questions...and yes, I was still drunk and wondering where the Catholic section was...and my tongue would not move....I could not ask her...for I knew what the numbers meant and I knew she was death waiting for my response...and I ran...RAN to find air...yes Brian, it is as difficult as Life and again I suggest...go there
once

but do not go drunk

Peace

Sub-Radar-Mike said...

I like to think we're progressing past times like these, but then again you never know...

Myrna R. said...

I visited Auschwitz when I lived in Germany. Your poem really should be on display in such a place.

Recently, I saw a movie, "Sarah's Key". Your poem should be read after any viewing of that movie, as well as others that depict this time of darkness in our human history.

So sad that unfortunately, in different degrees history has repeated itself and ethnic cleansing is too familiar a term.

Daydreamertoo said...

We all say: Such things ought to never happen again" We all know it happened and it happened because of one man's hatred of a race he felt superior too. He hated the Jewish people because he feared them and his charisma and enthusiasm was enough to feed a whole country on his dreams of a 'pure' race. There is no such thing in existence as a pure race and there hasn't been since man first walked across continents to explore and interbred with those people's in those lands.
This is a heart-breaking write on so many levels for so many reasons.
And everyone says: "Never again" yet, during the Bosnina/Croatia/Serbia war it was only a few weeks into the war and I saw pictures on the news of men with hollow chests staring out of hollow eyes from behind barbed wire, and I cried, because until that moment in time, I truly believed in "Never again" and yet, there it all was happening in my day and age. And, the torture, rape and killings of people by people is still happening in the middle east to some extent even now.
Will we ever learn? I pray so or, God help us all.
Deeply emotional write Brian, something that you will never forget too.

Fred Rutherford said...

Wow, a real masterpiece here. Deep in worldly tragedy and sadness, but written so masterfully, the taste of ash, the bodies, the repetition of the name. All aided the mood and tone of the piece. Awesome job. Probably shouldn't have posted it though, as this is so journal worthy. Great write. Thanks

Louise said...

Wow....intense , raw write....just insane. I can't imagine it could happen again, but we must never let it. Not ever...

jackie dick said...

This is bone scraping against bone pain, Brian. Deeply felt, powerful, burned and tatooed into memory. A truly amazing write. xxx

mrs mediocrity said...

this broke my heart wide open, just as going there a few years back did, and yes, (i saw your comment about the shoes) it was the shoes that killed me, the shoes in a heap of humanity, their shape can never be discarded, that is the image i never forget.

as this is a poem i shall never forget.

rosaria said...

Too much.
Too raw.
And yet, we forget, unless we see and smell and remember.

CC Champagne said...

Only a few days ago was the 67th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau and I spent almost a whole day reading about it... I think that might be what is keeping me together after reading this, and still I am deeply touched. Beautiful, but so evil.

wayside word garden said...

This is so powerful, and heartbreaking. I appreciate what others have said-- that yes, it can happen again... human nature has not changed... we need to be reminded, although it is hard, we need to go and look, and remember. Thanks for sharing this.

Divalounger said...

This is the story of so many--your poem will touch the hearts of all who read it Brian --I am in him and next to him and with him in your piece---

@AudreyHowitt

Mark Windham said...

May we never forget...or have we already?

well written sir

happygirl said...

Hate hAte haTe and more hatE. Strong piece. I liked the span of time. It shows how long hate can last. LOTS of hate out there.

Rachel said...

wow.

RICH. i am reflecting now with few words.

Bar None Publishing Group said...

That is one of the bleakest, darkest, hopeless, brilliant pieces that I have ever read and now I must pick up the pieces of my shattered soul.

Anthony Desmond said...

whoa... that was too powerful for words. :'(

Adura Ojo said...

Raw and powerful, Brian. Dare I say history has a knack of repeating itself because we humans (unfortunately) never learn.

Arron Shilling said...

the picture is an excellent choice and projects the beast therein - awesome exploration and to my mind quite stunning in the end - the devices within are well used and it all adds up to something brilliant - what a read !

Nezzy said...

Oh the emotion in this one brought tears to my eyes.

This is one of your best Brian!

God bless and have a peaceful day man!!!

Maureen said...

A visit to the Holocaust Museum here in D.C. is, as your poem shows, a deeply affecting experience. What lends that experience great sadness is to see that the museum also must recount what evil continues to this day. What is unspeakable is our failure to not speak out for those who have no voice. Bravo on a very difficult subject to articulate.

Susie Clevenger said...

I my god this breaks my heart and brings me to tears...such a marvelous piece Brian. Thanks for writing it and thanks for sharing..

Steve King said...

This is so dramatic and pitiful. I've never been to the museum, but I feel as if you've taken me there. Even a couple of minutes is almost to much. Nice job on this. You have to be so...outside yourself...to try and do this topic justice.

Joanne Elliott said...

You've captured the horror. I'm sorry there was and still is any such horror to remember, to contemplate, but we must remember and know what us humans are capable of doing. Maybe that way we won't do it anymore.

tracy said...

I bet that is a very moving place to visit. Thank God Mankind is so much more civilized now. (!)

Uneven Stephen said...

So sad, but so urgently important. These lines in particular literally gave me shivers:

"experiencing, reading, watching like a rApe,
our eyEs stapled oPen and can't look away".

Wow.

Vernon Wildy, Jr. said...

Brian, that is raw and intense. Left me with my jaw open, just felt the realness of it all.

Beachanny said...

Never let them forget, these were awful times. I was alive during those awful times but the stories came to the US slowly especially the Texas panhandle. No one wanted to believe. I used to stop in at a Jewish temple on my way home from Catholic school. I asked the rabbi why Christians hated Jews when Jesus was a Jew. It seemed crazy. He said all people must learn to love. About three years ago, I met a man in Lake Placid. He'd served as assistant to that rabbi - he told me the rabbi had survived Aushwitz. I never knew, I guess he thought I was too young to hear of it. But now I do. It's all in your poem.

hedgewitch said...

Good to see you writing it out--had to stop by and see what your inner self made of it all--hideous hideous and appalling what we do to each other--and never think it can't happen here, or anywhere--that's the beast inside no one likes to think about. Fine job, brian.

Tara Miller said...

You write so beautifully about such a horrific, heartbreaking time in our history. I could feel the sadness and heaviness of being there and see through your eyes the story you tell of one...of many. Even with the heaviness of subject, this is one of my favorites.

Fireblossom said...

Utter horror.

JJ Roa Rodriguez said...

Heartbreaking! Yet wonderfully written...

JJRod'z

Jerry said...

I have been reading Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas and this poem underlines my disbelief in all that transpired. The human evil and tragedy of that scar on history. The choppy feel to your poem matches the ambiance of that horrific time.

Liz @ A Nut in a Nutshell said...

Utterly hearbreaking

marousia said...

Brian - absolutely stunning - you capture the internal monologues so well - and the theme is one that should never be forgotten - masterful writing - I am commenting with google coz Blogger is not accepting wordpress today for some reason

Ginny Brannan said...

This left me shaking, with goosebumps and a lump in my throat. Hard to imagine, to comprehend the horror. May we never forget.

Ravenblack said...

Absolutely speechless here.

Iggyn8us said...

I actually followed my mother to college one day I was playing hookey or something. I waited outside the Great Hall where my mother was giving a presentation about the Holocaust. I can only remember peeking in and looking at my mother's slideshow presentation.All I can remember after that was throwing up many times......Thanks for the memory...It had to be remembered.

Charles Miller said...

There's a saying that we shoukd never Shoah, the Holocaust. That those who don't remember the past are condemned to repeat it. These are not cliches, no matter how many times they're said. The truth of your poem is the truth of these words too. Your relivingbthe past, identifying with the victim, is our way of making them true. You've brought the memory of one, of many, who died so horribly that words often never live up to the terror that was theirs. And thru your living testimony to their lives, as much as their deaths, we can hope to take the axe to the root that makes this crime against life posdible. May your words expunge the hate that gave birth to such terror.

PattiKen said...

Such a painful read, Brian. The saddest thing for me is knowing that man's inhumanity to man continues. We look at pictorial history of just how base a human can be, and cluck in judgment. Then we turn our backs in hate at those who are a different color than we, who worship differently, who live differently, who love differently. And yes, sometmes we kill them, those who are different.

Celestial Dreamz said...

so touching ... your words have successfully created this tight feeling in the stomach ... very powerful.


... and I wanted to say this for a long time now - It's amazing how you visit every blog and each poem and read so thoroughly before leaving comments! Do you realise that it's humanly not possible always and you always amaze me ... you have got to be thoroughly passionate about poetry, dedicated to whatever you do and above all an extremely kindhearted human being. - sorry I wanted to say this for long and didn' know where, so .... hope it's ok.

PattiKen said...

One other thing, Brian. We often hear the number six million. What was done to those six million was horrific and shameful. But the actual number of victims is put somewhere between 11 and 17 million piople, all of who suffered atrocities. I wish that as we remember and regret, we would include the Gypsies, Soviet prisoners of war, Polish and Soviet civilians, homosexuals, people with disabilities, Catholics, Jehovah's Witnesses and other political and religious opponents in those memories.

Steve E said...

Tabor write that maybe we are returning to this with a different mask.

Well, I think we HAVE returned there, with all the uprisings, Arab Spring, and human rights almost non-existent in many countries.

And we, us...we lay down like sheep, when even our ELECTED peeps treat us like 'subjects' instead of "We the People"...gives understanding how so many watched it all happen, and did nothing.

Peace to us all!

flaubert said...

Brian, I just watched Shoah for a second time last year. You have captured the horror with your character here, Brian. Strong and poignant write.

Pamela

Gloria said...

sad and so hard, really hard dear Brian!

~L said...

how do you do it... write such a powerful post... pull the emotions out of one and make it beautiful all at the same time. I don't even think these words will bring justice to how amazing this poem was!! This was very moving!

~L

Teresa said...

Very powerful.

Lori said...

I've not been here to visit you in forever and a day and here I sit speechless and raw with emotions...you never cease to amaze me Brian...bravo! So thankful that I had this moment to stop by.

I hope all is well with you and yours. So thankful you are still writing!

Quotes,Photos and a little Poetry said...

it made me think a lot. and visions, sad visions were relived. Great write though.

wurdz said...

If anyone could pick up the inner sorrow that a city holds...and put it on paper-that would be you. The feeling of being inside the mind of someone traveling towards hell is amazing.The eyes,eyes...the window to the soul. In this case,emptiness and despair.Great piece.

Patricia said...

Hey Bri...
the tension you build here takes me to a place I pray we never have to live through again. The children... tears...

Becca said...

I have been there and it is just heartbreaking. You did a great job of putting it into words!

Caty said...

Brian, I felt like I was in the Holocaust Museum again. I'm glad I visited, and the visit is still fresh in my mind seven months later. I've never understood Hate.

aidz said...

Thnx for yr comments on my writes and well this one has a taste all its own... like stepping into another world

Brendan said...

So I'll venture you were at the holocaust museum in DC -- a cavern harrow into the heart of darkness, revealing through the ghost of a witness the extent bad testosterone can go to pull the wings off every fly. Art is in the brain -- in this poem -- a bulb which sadly reveals how dark and deadly are the recesses of the same brain. Our contemporary existence is all about hiding from those images, yet without seeing them -- feeling them - we are doomed to repeat the same sins, dropping bombs on Afghan farmers from drones, letting the poor rot in ghettos back home. Fine work, Brian. - Brendan

Jyoti Mishra said...

very deep n strong..
felt deep in my heart..
very well portrayed

Dave King said...

This goes way beyond good, special or any other description other than essential. It should be essential reading in schools and permanently posted somewhere for public reading. Can't say I ENJOYED reading it, but it will be a long while before I forget it.

Semaphore said...

You approach a theme like this with reverence and thought, immediacy and humility. Well-wrought.

Mary said...

Whew, does this leave an impression. A painful read, but the picture you painted shows truth.

Elizabeth Young said...

You are extremely brave to have even touched this topic Brian, but then to have done it justice makes me weep a lifetime.

Elizabeth Young said...

You are extremely brave to have even touched this topic Brian, but then to have done it justice makes me weep a lifetime.

Lisa Golden said...

You captured the essence of the museum in this piece. The flood of emotion, the inability to believe that humans can be so evil to one another, the terror, the bland acceptance, the human connection.

I will never forget the looks on my children's faces as we paused on the bridge and looked at the photos and portraits that spanned the walls of three floors. That shtetl wasn't far from where my husband's grandfather came from in 1914.

Lady Nyo said...

What can I say, Brian...powerful, haunting stuff....the ghosts of memories and history. As I am half-Hungarian...my family suffered as so many more did.

Thank you, Brian, for bringing this to our eyes, and our minds, and our hearts.

Powerful, powerful.

Peace.

Lady Nyo

kaykuala said...

Chilling! It's just unthinkable of what man can do to man. Such happenings in varying degrees are common in war zones even in present times. A pity!

Hank

Andrew Kreider said...

so powerful - took my breath away. Thanks for trying to express the unexpressible... I need to read this one again.

C Rose said...

the phrasing you use like "feel their ash on the back of my throat" nailed my emotions to the walk, you made this dread palpable...very compelling Brian ~ Rose

TALON said...

This was difficult to read, Brian. A rawness and a realness that is beyond heartbreaking.

Reena Walkling said...

always beyond anything I can imagine ...

Kavita said...

Tight...heartrending!!! I was immediately reminded of the picturization of Pink Floyd's Wall album... And of their track Comfortably Numb...only, there was nothing 'comfortable' about this...

What a poem!!! Made me shudder!!!

Bianca said...

Thanks for writing on such a topic Brian, I enjoyed learning about the holocaust as I was growing up. Anything powerful like this I really love and I think you done a fantastic job.

Ed Pilolla said...

holy shit.
i said a prayer to recover.
that was hard hitting.

Katherine Krige said...

parts of me will never leave this museum

-and that is our penance for being

a difficult journey B, that will definitely haunt you for as long as you need to learn

amyeverett said...

This is so sad. I visited the worst camp in germany I cried so hard. I couldnt take it

colleen said...

Good to give voice to the voiceless. Chilling. This is a good way to approach.

pandamoniumcat said...

I've come back to read this one a few times now...and I always feel whatever I comment will be lacking...such a hard thing to comprehend...the hatred behind these horrendous acts...it does leave you numb...it is certainly a powerful write!

Divya said...

Ohh this was painful to feel.
You made the history to be felt again,..
Havent posted in the OLN this week..hustle bustle for my wedding in full swing which is due in next 2 weeks... so playing part.. a silent one looking at what others have to offer :)
And cocktail was hard to start and left my eyes moist ..

Dave King said...

This one has taken hold of me. I came back for another read, and it's even more powerful than last time.

James Rainsford said...

Raw and hard edged Brian. Every sentiment here needs to be voiced & you've managed an authentic write.

becca givens said...

I have heard about the museum, and think it is an incredible idea to connect one of the spirits from this nightmare to each visitor attending ... makes it more visceral, more in tune to the times, and hopefully conveys a lesson to take with the viewer and continue to share for generations to come, when the survivors of that generation are no longer with us. Brian, this was an incredible write ... difficult, but mesmerizing and very visceral! Thank you for sharing ~

adeeyoyo said...

Unbelievably sad...

adeeyoyo said...

I am in the middle of reading 'The Last Jews in Berlin' by Leonard Gross.

joanna said...

hell, brian. no words.

Goofball said...

I feel like choking

We must all go to such museums now and then and return....to choke and feel nausea and to remember . We need to remember to stop it all still happening

Syd said...

I can remember my first time in the Holocaust Museum. I walked out with tears streaming down my face. What we do to each other is appalling.

william said...

sounds def a place we all need to visit, again well spoken words form a great piece..

Joanna Jenkins said...

Big sigh. My family are survivors and it still takes me breath away thinking of it.

Well done. jj