Tuesday, November 15, 2011

OpenLinkNight: Truth in adverti-sin

Photo courtesy of Flickr: marissaorton

Tags in clothing are a pain in the ass
and pointless, just a place to put the logo
brand name and no one flips it over to notice
where it was 'Made in...'

does it really
matter as long as its priced right or sports
the look?

If I had my way, the tag front would
be the face of the one that made it, kicking
the corporate logo to the back, I want
to see the mother that sweat it out in the back
room, the size of the immigrant cheeks telling me
how much they made per stitch, and in the child's
eyes a reflection of the boss on nights when
his wife would not put out and he came
looking for the help,

So that every time I pull the shirt over my head
I have to look---look them in the eyes, I want stickers
on plastic packaged beef of the cow whose
hank I am about to chew, supermarket
vegetable bags with hollow farmers faces
and gas pumps decorated with oil covered pelicans
instead of cartoon cars that swill gas like
chocolate milk and smile like Joe Camel---

Let's put a face on our consumption,
because there always is a price

We might...we might...stop wearing clothes,
lose weight and be forced to walk rather than
confront the images that questions our preferences
of human dignity or fashion sense---all us, naked people,
walking around trying not to peek, planting
great gardens but steering clear of fleshy apples,
petting snakes and we'd call it Eden and
rebuke the gods living in our wallets, closets
and stomachs

But then again it's almost winter and frost-
bite could lead to painful nights and those
winds can cut right through you, am I the only
one shivering, who really cares where it all
comes from any way, as long as
I am comfortable

You are comfortable---

aren't you?

It is OpenLinkNight, where all the brooding poets come out of their coffins in search of tasty verse, so no matter your blood type, spill some on the page and bring your poems. This week Hedgewitch is stirring the cauldron at the pub. Doors open at 3 pm EST, do stop in.

122 comments:

Slamdunk said...

I like your thought of truth in advertising Brian. I doubt I be so concerned about what I believe to be a $2 bargain.

DJan said...

This is very profound and moving. Yes, there is always a price on consumption, and we make a good try at disguising it. Thank you for this one, Brian. I am trying very hard to eat Slow Food and reduce my consumption.

kaykuala said...

Advertising is a dirty word.You have done well to portray the helplessness and ridiculous nature prevailing to make it look so unnecessary.

Hank

Everyday Goddess said...

slam dunk.

Bonnie said...

... not after reading that ...!!! A big part of the power of your words, Brian, is their ability to make us uncomfortable ... and in so doing make us re-think our comfortable patterns of consumption. Thank you.

hedgewitch said...

It's a difficult question, how to answer the basic human needs we all have without exploiting others. In a better world, people would make things and be compensated for it in a way that lets them have decent lives. But there's always the greed for MORE money behind it--it isn't that it's wrong to wear clothes or eat food, its that the *production* of these things has become twisted and wrong. Gosh--babbling away here--an excellent piece, brian, asking all the right questions.

Magpie said...

It would be nice to go back to simpler times when what we wore we made and what we ate we raised with love...but I think that ship has sailed on its way to America, land of dreams.

Magpie said...

It would be nice to go back to simpler times when what we wore we made and what we ate we raised with love...but I think that ship has sailed on its way to America, land of dreams.

Caty said...

before I got to the "naked" part of your piece, I was thinking, "I would definitely be naked and hungry if they advertised the truth". Sometimes we need a good reminder of the true value of our comfort

Hilary said...

Powerful piece, Brian. There is always a high price for our comfort

Mama Zen said...

Damn cool write, Brian.

Sheila Moore said...

I am comfortable but now...also guilty! This stanza blows me away:

We might...we might...stop wearing clothes,
lose weight and be forced to walk rather than
confront the images that questions our preferences
of human dignity or fashion sense---all us, naked people,
walking around trying not to peek, planting
great gardens but steering clear of fleshy apples,
petting snakes and we'd call it Eden and
rebuke the gods living in our wallets, closets
and stomachs

Anyes said...

I'd go for the tag in full view letting me know every time I am looking for a bargain, it's at some one else's expense. The price of my comfort is too expensive, you are right Brian :-)

Pat Hatt said...

So true, I never believe the crap they spew.
And never looked at it like that, but one truly would have a whole different tune at their mat.
If the face of the person getting 10 cents an hour was there, instead of some dumb little logo that rubs against ones neck hair.
Although me and food have no consumption worries at all
Well maybe just pringles at my hall..haha

Daydreamertoo said...

It would be so wonderful if we could all put the world to rights. Long ago we stopped praying to God and began to worship money. Money IS God nowadays and the more people have of it, the more they want.
We only have to see how unkind we are to animals with factory farming and such to see that we've lost our humanity. We need only look at all the grotesque pictures of torture in the mid east to see that human life means nothing anymore. It is extinguishable to some, just as candles are.
We have become a world who has forgotten what love, kindness and compassion really means.
I applaud your stance on this. As a 99% vegetarian, my friend once said to me "If you saw what happens in slaughter houses, you'd never eat meat again." I don't need to see it for my mind to know the fear those animals go through and the fear all those in the middle east go through at the hands of their torturers. And, while we keep buying, the sweat shops will keep paying peanuts for the work.
As a race (human) we have a lot to answer for.
Well said Brian.

Tara Miller said...

I agree with DJan - seems there is always a price on consumption. I don't believe the majority of us want it this way and to think about just how huge this issue is can be very overwhelming. Bit by bit we can make a difference and make changes if we are intentional in our consumption. A huge lifestyle change, yes. Worth it to save a life, yes. Very eye opening write today, love.

Steve E said...

Consumption used to be a disease

.....guess it still IS!

(Signed)--uncomfortable

♫♪♥PhilO♥♪♫ said...

Advertising, brands and tags.. what all it does!
If only life was simple and people were not so materialistic!

Sue said...

A little less so after reading this poem...

"/

Valerie said...

I even feel guilty for cutting out the label that irritates my skin....

ayala said...

This is excellent...touched a nerve with me...a great issue, thank you.

Fred said...

Really nice write. I've thought along similar lines with the food we eat, not exactly how you put it, which far surpasses the idea I had, but I love the sweatshop idea, that would be something.

Your closing stanza, great read on society. really nice, thanks

Tabor said...

This is a great idea, but we would probably all get really thin and go around boney naked.

Kulio said...

Wow what a shirt that would be.

ds said...

No, I'm not (comfortable). And you've expressed that so very well. "Let's put a face on our consumption,/because there always is a price"
Yes, indeedy. Thank you.

Mark Kerstetter said...

Brian, this is one thing about our culture that is all wrong, sick, if you ask me: the way we turn everything, even our food, into a product. People go to the grocery store and don't shop for food, they shop for ideas, they eat products/cartoons. I feel very strongly about this, and often think about the title of Burroughs' novel - 'Naked Lunch'. Regardless of what one thinks of the novel, Burroughs had the laudable intention of forcing the reader to see what's on the end of his fork.

Cheryl said...

My father could have written this had he the talent. One change I know he'd make is putting the sun-baked face of the farmer who raised that beef.

manicddaily said...

Hi Brian--it's a big and important issue. Maybe WalMart wouldn't sell so much. I'm not sure other places are much better.

I like the idea of everyone walking around naked--as an idea (only)!

K.

Maureen said...

You might consider sending this in to Split This Rock.

Beachanny said...

Scorching commentary in poetic form. You're carrying the torch for us, Brian. Carry on and Right on, too btw!

theborgpoet said...

Ouch! If they can put a picture to cigarette packaging, why not the rest?

magicinthebackyard said...

"let's put a face on our consumption..." yes! let's do! powerful and poignant message! speak it man!!! bravo!

http://magicinthebackyard.wordpress.com/2011/11/14/the-widow/

Bar None Publishing Group said...

Well done, sir. Poets should always rattle cages.
Cheers,
Mark Butkus

Anthony Desmond said...

well done man... advertising is evil... always looking to hook another soul.

Sub-Radar-Mike said...

The sad price of a consumer culture :\

signed...bkm said...

We are all apart of the machine called the economy...if we all had to go back to making everything for ourself maybe we would think twice where things come from...bkm

lookingforroots said...

To answer the question, no. Not comfortable at all. And yet...isn't it so easy to forget? The true costs of consumption...something to keep working to expose, yes? You've captured this beautifully. Uncomfortably. Very well written.

turtlememoir said...

I so agree with the sentiment here, Brian, brilliantly written, as usual... but, I think if you don't mind I'll hang on to my clothes for now - it's pretty frosty these nights

bajanpoet said...

"If I had my way, the tag front would
be the face of the one that made it, kicking
the corporate logo to the back, I want
to see the mother that sweat it out in the back
room, the size of the immigrant cheeks telling me
how much they made per stitch, and in the child's
eyes a reflection of the boss on nights when
his wife would not put out and he came
looking for the help"

This is a powerful piece. I need to read this over... I might stop wearing clothes... wait, no. That might be traumatic for others... hehe

tinkwelborn said...

nice wordplay here, beginning with the title.
I like the simile of cartoon cars smiling like Joe Camel...fun stuff.

''Let's put a face on our consumption'' powerful words.

no, I'm not comfortable...good 'pol-piece'

Luke Prater said...

'Ugly truth' poetry is so important but hard to read, of course. But I always do read it; I think it's my favourite kind. I appreciate so much when poets and other artists aren't just looking to make their reader/audience feel good/happy, but to make a statement and make them squirm a little. Well-balanced Narrative here Brian. It could have been a rant that a lot might have stopped reading straight away (I fall into that trap sometimes). Thin line between and you're on the right side of the line here for sure. Love your politics

somewhereamelody said...

I agree with every line here Brian. This issue runs deep for me. I am very conscious about labels for all the reasons you've written. We either buy fairtrade or second hand round these parts :)
Profound, important and beautiful poetry!

Shelley Lundquist said...

A very thoughtful and provocative piece... very powerful... getting back to what matters.

Adura Ojo said...

There's always a price on consumption certainly. Can only hope we consume our desire before it consumes us. Great verse and thought provoking, Brian.

happygirl said...

I like the thinking behind this one. If I lost weight and had a rockin' bod, I'd be nekkid every day. :) and comfortable.

quazism said...

Wow Brian. What a call to action. Its so true though;for the sake of looking cool and general convenience we will just look the other way.

Joanne Elliott said...

You said it and said it well. Sometimes we don't want to hear it mostly because it would inconvenience us to do otherwise or it makes us feel overwhelmed about what to do...but making the right choices we must if there is to be change.

I like your tag idea and there are lots of great lines in this. I like:
"Let's put a face on our consumption,
because there always is a price"
This needs to be part of a public servcie announcement or something.

Shawna said...

I wasn't expecting this particular turn of the tag:

"a reflection of the boss on nights when his wife would not put out and he came looking for the help"

But you sure took it to another level with this!

bodhirose said...

Damn powerful commentary, Brian.

Goofball said...

we do lose touch with the sources of our consumption and that is a bad thing. Our food chain is very screwed up.

For labour on clothes & other producs I wonder though if it improves if we stop buying "made in xxx" countries products because the labour conditions are bad there. Because then they are without job altogther. That's no good either but continuing to buy is bad either as we do not want to support bad labour conditions. ARgh. So how do we fix that?

And yet, can our world sustain a world with good labour everywhere and hence the possibility to consume equally lots as we do globally? we can't! So what is the solution?


I also know some friends that out of principle refuse to drink any softdrink from a big international corporation as that is bad....working for a big international corporation myself, I disagree that a global companies are by definition bad.



It's hard to make concious choices

Heaven said...

Sweatshops came to my mind; who is to fault really for the abuse and greed of goods? Business will only do because there is a demand for it. Your lines are my fav:

"Let's put a face on our consumption,
because there always is a price"

davidallenpoet said...

Well, no, I am not comfortable now that you reminded me of what globalization of industries has done to us. Hard to believe it's cheaper to make sweatshirts in the sweatshops in Bangladesh and ship and sell to America than it is to set up a factory to make the same crappy clothing in the depressed Midwest. Great poem. Wish I had written it.

Claudia said...

there always ia a price..the only question is who is paying.. good you're making us uncomfortable with your writing - also like how you carve the thin lines - we all know..and no one wants it - but as soon as it's getting "cold" and uncomfortable for us, we change our mind and close our eyes again..

Claudia said...

..and thanks for waiting so patiently for my comment..smiles

Heather said...

oooh, this is deep - thought provoking stuff here today...

Seek The Sun said...

I love this piece! I've always likened the human species to locusts,fly in and consume in hoards until the ground is stripped clean and then move on to the next fresh crop. I love the question at the end, posed to us, your audience.

Seek The Sun said...

Oops, wrong "hoards"....should be hordes...smiles!

Tino said...

If only fella, if only.
But, we are allowed our dreams, aren't we?

wolfsrosebud said...

first thing that comes out of a new item is its tag... glad I'm in good company... you think of the weirdest things to write about

Ravenblack said...

Uncomfortable to read. It is true, we would turn a blind eye because it's simply easier to not know or just turn away from the reality of the things we so love to have are things made by people in possibly terrible conditions.

It would be interesting to see tags with the faces of those who made it. A side thought here -- that it would be good both ways -- the worker gets his due more likely, and perhaps he gets something more than measly pay -- gain some pride in his work. One wonders what would be the consequence of that.

Thanks for the poem, much to think about.

liv2write2day said...

Brian, to me this is an example of effective activism. You made me stop and think on many counts. When my uncle and dad ran the family clothing manufacturing business they would not send business overseas nor hire it out to sweat shops. They were successful. When "someone else" took over, he did. And it failed. Karma, perhaps?

Nick Rolynd said...

Very nice. Yes, the sheer amount of implications we ignore daily is astounding. Most people never think to look behind the scenes. Materialism has drowned out all desire for truth and sense.

Great piece. =)

Laurie Kolp said...

Wow, Brian. This really packs a mighty punch, especially:

Let's put a face on our consumption,
because there always is a price

Charles Elliott/Beautyseer said...

Enjoyed reading this, and the conscience very evident behind it. In fact, it reminded me in some way of former Poet Laureatte Robert Pinsky's wonderful poem, "Shirt," which he was kind enough to read at my request at Whittier College when he was here last. One of my favorites! You can read it and see him perform it here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB5e6DM6qPo

California Girl said...

I know I should comment on the poetry but I can't put it off any longer...whose photo in your profile?

adeeyoyo said...

So true, Brian. We, most of us, know that the people actually doing the work, machinists, farmers, etc. get the smallest cut. All the other hands involved get most. Sweat shops are the pits. Naked could be good, lol, if it made one ashamed of the FAT!

Carys said...

Wow, consumer accountability and responsibility. Heavy topic, deftly woven here my friend.

Beth Winter said...

Oh, Brian. I am very comfortable at the moment. The thought of discarding it all makes me fear that I will become a hermit especially considering that I'm as curious as a cat and I know I would peek. The question is would I giggle.

Fabulous work. :) I will think of this as I rip the tags out of my clothes. I don't like tags, always rip them out.

Joseph Hesch said...

Brilliant concept, Brian, etched in acid and polished to a fine sheen. So much of consumerism is built upon ugly subterfuge that you have punctured.

Daniel said...

I was comfortable, ...., until I read this. Thanks a lot dude.

chromapoesy.com said...

and in the child's
eyes a reflection of the boss on nights when
his wife would not put out and he came
looking for the help,

This hits like a ton of bricks and I've always said that until we consumers change our behavior nothing will change for the environment or human rights. You know there's a part of Jamaica that exists outside international boundaries so they simply ship in people from wherever to take terrible factory jobs. Then when someone dies or raises a fuss about pay they ship that bunch back to their country of origin and find people from a new country to exploit! Most countries don't have effective child labor laws.

Mary said...

Brian, this is a thought-provoking write. Yes, so ofren we don't think about who made our clothes, where they came from. We don't face the facts (as Pat Hatt might say). It amazes me how you keep coming up with one profound idea after another in your writing.

mrs mediocrity said...

I'm not comfortable, I haven't been for a while. I think we all know we need to do something, though we don't always know what. If we each took a few small steps it would make a difference. If we all stepped out of our comfort zone just a bit...

really great piece.

Pat said...

"advertiSIN" indeed! Food for thought. This is disturbing in so many ways.

Betsy said...

We've all helped create the monster, haven't we!

Who Is Afraid Of Miss Lovett? No, Mrs.Lovett... said...

"You are comfortable---
aren't you?"

Hello! Brian...
My answer is a re-sounding...No!

I'm also not comfortable with the thoughts Of the...immigrant cheek, and the child's eyes...

If only..."I want stickers
on plastic packaged beef of the cow whose hank I am about to chew,

supermarket
vegetable bags with hollow farmers faces

and gas pumps decorated with oil covered pelicans
instead of cartoon cars that swill gas like

chocolate milk and smile like Joe Camel---


Thanks, for always being honest and challenging your readers to think about things we sometimes don't want to deal with in our lives.
deedee :-(

pervagus said...

Stirring as usual. If only world solutions could be crafted like your poems, with care and insight. Well written and suitably thought provoking, or rather knowledge jogging.

Ginny Brannan said...

A many-sided consumer conundrum. I like this, makes one think!
Suffice to say, I have mixed feelings. On the one hand, hard to hear things like foreign manufacturers that keep workers in dorms so that they can be close enough to keep those products coming. But on the other hand, the money those workers earn helps support extended families who have little to nothing to begin with, and on the third hand (like that guy the Nationwide ads now), when we sent all of our work out of the country for cheaper labor, we dug our own hole with no work for the people here at home that lost jobs with the economy crash. Won't even start on the supermarket side! Yup, faces on labels an interesting concept. I'm just happy if I can afford anything these days!!

yellowhousecafe said...

This one spoke to me, Brian, and I wish more peeps thought like you. People think I'm radical because I wont go to Walmart; I bike to work; I'm vegan. You know what I say...I've still got a long ways to go before I'm truly radical and not supporting the inhu-MAN economy. Dig this write! ~

colleen said...

Excellent idea. I especially love this line: Let's put a face on our consumption,because there always is a price.

Shashi said...

Hi Brian

Yes we are all very insensitive to what we do as routine or what we use... becuase that is how the mind is made... for its own survival and preservation... I could relate to the pain that you are putting in these words and the thoughts of suffering that you have portrayed along... and then you go on to say in the end ... that is how its going to be.... what else is there to say... If we don't wear or use, where the prosperity of the rich will go, or where the two crumbs of bread the poor will find in the end.. there is always a price as you say...

'Let's put a face on our consumption,
because there always is a price "

Shashi
ॐ नमः शिवाय
Om Namah Shivaya
http://shadowdancingwithmind.blogspot.com/2011/11/whispers-where-you-will-go.html

Jehanne's doodles said...

You got some good point there Brian, although not about not wearing clothes - it is bloody cold here in a jeans, wool socks and a wool sweater.
Now that we have some baa sheep I don't think I can eat lamb even though I know it's good.

jackie dick said...

Wow! What a powerful piece is this, Brian! Nooooo, I am not comfortable after reading this. And yes there is a price on our consumption...our greed...our often misdirected productivity and industry. And what will we do about it? Certainly not go around naked and try not to peek...how long will it take to wake up, I wonder....for all of us. One of your best, for me. xxx

Amy said...

MAN! Brian, you nailed it on two fronts: political and moral (the two being mutually exclusive these days). I applaud this and want to copy all elected officials.

For the record, God doesn't care for comfortable Christians! So that's where I'm at... thanks, Amy
http://sharplittlepencil.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/the-balancing-act-of-life/

lowfrequencies said...

printed tags have solved all of my problems

beckykilsby said...

No... suitably prodded..squirming yes... excellent job Brian..you've really humanized this issue..

The opening sections in fullfrontalfocus..

JANU said...

Nice write as ever.

Broken Sparkles said...

Sad how sometimes we find comfort in things and we don't even think how they've come to us, who sat hours to create it and what's the story behind. A lot of wisdom in your words!

Steve King said...

I love your purposeful poetry...this had such an organic feel, nothing was forced. You really capitalized on a creative moment. I enjoyed this write.

Lorraine said...

oh yes and put the face of babe on pork and those beuatiful oh so sad-eyes of a cow, or the crying of babies when they get seperated..I hear you , the scream of freedom

Dave King said...

I had a headmistress once who bought tags from Harrods to sew into her clothes - her way of going up in the world?

whereslanda said...

I found this quite profound. Firstly, I have never thought about putting photos & wages of those who created our products on our products. I think if we did it could potentially have a positive effect in encouraging more people to buy local. It seems the only pictures you see on advertising these days are of those who smoked too many cigarettes so you can see the result of smoking too much.

Belinda said...

Oh, don't get me started! This is a very important subject and one that we all must bear in mind when we make a purchase. This reminds me of Naomi Klein's book called No Logo, a must read for anyone caught in the vicious consumption cycle (arguably all of us, right?). I admit I don't always buy American but the bigger question is how often/how many/how much is enough.

Matt D said...

These are neat thoughts ... the Chinese continuously weaken their currency so they can keep selling to the US. It's hard to understand. Then what money they get they lend back to the US, even harder to understand.

A poem like this makes one think ... thank you.

the walking man said...

Cows are for eating
clothes are for wearing
what do I care
if they are steroid enhanced
or how many twelve hour days
the ten year old spent sewing
at 25 cents a week
to produce what I consume?


As long as Wal-Mart
sells it to me cheap.
They are job creators.

♥ Braja said...

My mother is 83 now, and when she was a young girl in Scotland, she trained to be a seamstress. She worked in a small store, and each dress they made, the girl who made it had their name stitched on it as the label. So in her town of Dundee, so many ladies were wearing the "Betty" design :)

When she had children of her own, she made all their clothes; and she'd always stitch labels in them...little things she'd find at haberdashery stores (in the end she owned her very own store). Her favorite tag (and mine, it was in my wedding dress!) was "Made with love by mother" :)

kez said...

oh for an ideal world ...love the thoughts on this but it would never happen nearest I seem to get is buying local products ...we can but dream ...thank you x

lifeisaroadtrip said...

I remember we had the "garment factory" in the town where I grew up. My husband's Mom and a lot of people used to be employed there. I can't remember how long ago it closed but it was a long, long time and put a lot of people out of work. And the hits just kept on coming. God Bless America.

C Rose said...

Love the way to carried this examination..."gods in our wallets",,,magnificent statement. Powerful and honest Brian ~ Rose

Natasha Head said...

Brian...this is awesome! Spent my wave of depression watching the Corporation for like the 100th time last evening...so this is quite fitting for my first poetry read of the morning...and I'm not crying, I am once again angered. Thanks so much for giving me the kick I needed to end MY pity party...there's a whole world out there that needs it more. Hope the word hangover hasn't been too hard on you!

Becky Sain said...

Very interesting thoughts for this morning -- thank you my friend.

joanna said...

comfortable? well, if i were before, i'm certainly not anymore... that alone is enough to make this brilliant, brian. yikes. you sure can cut with words. bravo. :)

blueviolet said...

It'll never change. It's gone too far.

Grandmother said...

You vividly bring home the point of our comfort sometimes being at the expense of those with no faces. Drives home the importance of each of us making informed decisions better for our planet and all those on it. Good write even if uncomfortable.

anglachel27 said...

Sometimes scathing observation is necessary, yet I feel most would not be able to stomach looking upon that which they consume so openly. It's sad that we've allowed ourselves to be caught up in the illusion at the cost of reality.
Gene

Yousei Hime said...

Wow, 104 comments. Touched a nerve? Challenging writing, and I loved how you ended it. No punches pulled. There are people behind everything in our lives, from the milk in the morning to the sheets at night.

As to your read on my telescope poem ... don't leave me hanging! I sincerely would like to know where I lose you as a reader and why you think that is. If there are crafting/writing issues, point those out as well. You can email me if you'd rather (tasmith1122@aol.com).

So glad you had the patience to trudge through it this time around. Even happier that we've been acquainted for over a year now. Here's to looking at one another even more often through poetry's lens.

Chris G. said...

They call it the i-generation...but it's not always sweet revelations therein. Oh the culture we do tuck ourselves away into...Poignant ending note, by the by - really drives the full weight of the work in with one final, deep-felt thrust.

Samuel Peralta / Semaphore said...

There is always a revolutionary undercurrent simmering in your poetry, which is your strongest feature. It isn't really a disillusionment per se, but a holding up of your mirror to truths that are not in open view.

Pauline said...

"You are comfortable---

aren't you?"

Not any more.

Lolamouse said...

Well, you just took all the fun out of my Christmas shopping! Seriously, though, this was sharp and smart. Unfortunately, it's very difficult to find products that are produced under humane conditions and that are affordable.

Arron Shilling said...

KICKASS bro!

The Noiseless Cuckooclock said...

THIS IS great.
also, keep in mind, any trade or deal is mutually made.

It is hard to accept such, but it is our life.

Another fundamental poem with handsome theme on it.

Way to go!

Poetry of the Day said...

lol i feel the same way!!! ADFASFDS RAGE! dumb tags

Madeleine Begun Kane said...

Your writing skills are nakedly clear. :)

SueAnn said...

I WAS comfortable and warm and feeling stylish. Now...not so sure!!
Hugs
SueAnn

James Rainsford said...

A poem with a genuine social conscience. I love it Brian.

Rebecca S. said...

I saw this great comic strip the other day. Steve Jobs has made it to heaven, where St. Peter is checking him in on his ipad. Jobs is indignant: "What am I doing in Heaven? I'm a Buddhist, at least reincarnate me!" Next frame, he is reincarnated - as a small boy putting iphones together in an apple factory. Hah!
You aren't the only one who cares...I wish our hands weren't so tied with the clothing and footwear issue. Not so long ago I could buy clothing made primarily in Canada or the US. Now? almost not possible.

lori said...

Maybe this would be the way to change it all. When we're not forced to look at how our ignorance hurts others, nothing changes. We're consumed with buying things cheaply, and it's been given to us at a much higher price than we realize. This is excellent. Really excellent.

Whosyergurl said...

I am WAY too comfortable!

My daughter is an attorney and she was on an investigation in Vietnam or Thailand...and went to a sweatshop. Of a well known company. She said it was awful.

Cheryl

Linda said...

When is the price too high? That is a question we must all ask ourselves sooner or later. Well done.

zumpoems.com said...

You capture so well the essence of these "comfortable" choices we make each day -- most commonly is our food selection which can be very uncomfortable for animals log pigs, cattle, sheep and coming up soon, turkeys....

Syd said...

Amen to this, Brian. One of the best statements yet about our consumerisms.