Friday, September 17, 2010

Magpie Tales: The Hourglass

Tracing a creased finger along the lower bulb of the hourglass, she watches sparkling sand trickle in an unbroken line, counting the time. It would not be long now, perhaps only a few hours remained, but she had no regrets at her decision. Hourglass in hand, she sits in the rocking chair by the crib, watching the gentle rise and fall of the baby's chest, measuring the progress of the sand through her fingers.

Barbara went to University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, to receive her degree in Studio Art. She was seldom found without a paint brush in her hand growing up and that love had only deepened as she matured. While most of her artwork was what many would consider abstract, her inspiration came from the community she found herself in. Often she would sit at a table outside the coffee shop on University Avenue and watch life unfold around her.

Inspired by a dog leading its master down the sidewalk she began sketching on a pad she carried with her and never noticed the man slide into the adjacent seat at her table until he placed a package on the table. Her pencil jinked at the slight movement of the table, and she looked up, gasping when she found herself no longer alone.

"Can I help you?" she inquired, giving her eyes time to take in the man she had never seen before.

He had a thin face, with pencil thin lips, salt and pepper hair that hung to the points of his jawbone, but it was his auburn eyes that took her. He was middle aged, probably in his thirties, but there was something ancient in his eyes. Crossing on leg over another, he tapped a long finger on the brown, non-descript box.

"I know we have never met, but I have something for you," he replied, in a refined voice.

Before she could respond, he continued, "You can not open it, but you will want to keep it safe for when the time comes that you need it. You will marry a man the year after you graduate and try unsuccessfully to have children for many years. Finally you will become pregnant, but you will lose the child during birth. You can avoid this by opening this box, the night you go to the hospital."

The sudden burst of information that the man could have no way of knowing sent Barbara's head spinning. Raw emotions she had never felt over the loss of a child twisted in her stomach and she blinked to ease the pain. Opening her eyes, she found herself alone at the table. Looking around frantically, she saw many people walking but, slipping into shops, talking, but the peculiar man was no where in sight.

Rubbing her face with her hands, she thought she must have been concentrating too hard on the picture and nodded off to sleep and a weird dream. Then her eyes settled on the box that sat just beyond the head of her sketch pad on the table.

For weeks, Barbara was skittish around others, always looking around corners and in shadows, looking to see if the man was still following her. She kept the box at her apartment, under her bed, too afraid to open it and even more so to discard it. If the man's words held truth, she had a way to avoid the death of an innocent, of her baby, when the time came. Doubt crept in though, as her social life was dismal, as her focus was on her studies.

She met James at an exhibition of the student's artwork. He was just another in a long line of those that came to appreciate the show, but she found herself drawn into conversation with him during a lull in the crowd. Before the night was over, they exchanged phone numbers and made plans to have lunch the following day.

It did not take long for Barbara to fall in love with James and the remaining two years of their education, they were inseparable. Their senior year, James had got down on his knee outside the same building where they had met and asked her hand in marriage. She said yes, having forgotten by this time, the predictions the man had made.

Their marriage was like many others, the first couple years, struggling to get off the ground as they found jobs and entered a life of their own. In many ways it was sustained by youthful vigor. They tried for years to have children, even trying infertility treatments and when they were just about to accept that they would not be blessed with children, Barbara became pregnant.

Tears streamed down her face, relief flooding her body as she looked a the two line on the pregnancy test. Her heart jumped as she raced to find the phone to call James. Unable to locate it in the kitchen, she returned to their room, thinking she might have left her cell phone in the jeans she wore the day before. Opening the closet, she spied a brown box she had not seen in years. The pregnancy test slipped through her fingers, clattering on the floor.

James found her draped across the bed when he came from work. Thinking she was taking a nap, he was slipping out the door of their bedroom when he saw test stick by the closet. Retrieving it he could not help but let out an excited yell. Barbara stirred on the bed and he took her in his arms, elation spilling out of his mouth, but she heard none of it, only stared over his shoulder at the box peeking from within the closet.

For as much difficulty as they had in conceiving, Barbara's pregnancy was fairly routine. They were busy, preparing the house, converting a spare bedroom into a nursery. She kept the secrets of the box to herself, trying to put it out of her mind. Every time she had forgotten about it though, the box would turn up, on the kitchen counter, the passenger seat of her car, on her pillow. She thought to ask James if he was the one that was moving it about but was afraid then she would have to explain it to him. Everything was going so well, the doctors had confirmed the baby was healthy, so she kept returning the box in the back of her closet.

The baby's due date came and went, which the doctor's said was not necessarily unexpected with a first child, so they set a date for inducing labor if the baby did not come on it's own. That morning, as James went to take his shower, Barbara slipped into their room to retrieve the box. She thought reaching it in the back of the closet would be difficult with her swollen belly, but she found the box sitting neatly on their bed.

Making sure the water was running, she ran a fingernail underneath the end flap and let the contents spill on the bed cover; and envelope and an hourglass. Tearing open the envelope, she retrieved a small card that read:

Congratulations on the new life you carry within you. If you would like for him to live, take the hourglass out of the tube in which it is sealed. When you do the sand will begin to move and it run out, our transaction will be complete. A life for a life.

She sat staring at the note, trembling at what was being offered. Was it her life that would be taken? James? Was she willing to trade one for the other? She felt a soft kick at the side of her belly, her baby, and when she heard the the water of James' shower stop she quickly unstopped the tube, sliding the hourglass into her hand, watching the sand fall for the first time. She placed it on her bedside table and disposed of the card and the box.

Jacob was born that evening and was instantly adored by his parents. He nuzzled against Barbara's chest settling into sleep as she counted the ten pink fingers. Childbirth was relatively easy on Barbara, no complications, and they came home from the hospital a few days later and life settled into an uncomfortable rhythm of feeding and changing him.

One morning, after James had returned to work from his two week paternity leave, Barbara noticed, while putting on her make up, the first grey hair. She plucked it quickly, so as not to encourage others and tossed it in the garbage. When others started to appear by the afternoon, her first thought was of the hourglass. Running to their room, heart stammering, she found it laying on her pillow, nearly half the sand gone.

Angry, she threw the hourglass across the room, expecting it to shatter against the wall. As she watched it fly through the air, fear gripped her inner most parts, that it just might. It thunked hollow against the wall and fell. She rushed to retrieve it, stopping just short, to watch as sand continued to pour, defying gravity, in the upside down hourglass. Only now it was pouring faster.

Grabbing it she turned it over in her hands, but the pace was not abated. Tingling tightness filled her face and she ran once more to the mirror in the bathroom. She stared in disbelief as crevices crawled from the corners of her mouth and eyes, her cheeks sagged, then hollowed like flat balloons. Her lips curled back and her hair stood shock white. She aged forty years in a matter of minutes.

From his crib, Jacob began to cry, in piercing wails. Everything was moving too fast. Barbara's bones ached as she limped to his room, each step a labor of pain. Her body was betraying her. Placing her hand on his back, he squirmed then stilled. Her hand was little more than bone draped in skin. In her other hand she held the hourglass and sat in the rocking chair to look at it and see how much time she had left.

It is almost over, her body feels like a husk. James will be home soon, she thinks, wishing she had the energy to find the phone and speak to him one last time. She wonders what he will think, finding her here, a leaf whithered in the fall, watching over their child. Jacob, their beautiful auburn eyed child. She has no regrets, as she watches the last grains of sand slip through the hole.

This is a Magpie Tale.

117 comments:

Brian Miller said...

its a long one, i know...thanks for reading. hopefully you enjoyed it, or at least it gave you a shiver or two.

Steven Anthony said...

This was longer than usuall, but so worth the read....wow, you continue to amaze.

btw: I lived near charlottesville for awhile, cool to see it in print ;)

DJan said...

A Dorian Gray twist, in a way. Very good read.

Daniel said...

This was awesome. Very original. Dark and mysterious. Something from a twilight zone show.

Systematic Weasel said...

A wonderful read! =)

-Weasel

The Retired One said...

Fantastic story, but oh so sad....!! I want to find another ending where she could bargain with him for her youth to return! ha

Eva Gallant said...

wOW...how do you come up with these things?

Myrna R. said...

Wow! And Holloween isn't even here yet. Great, sad, spooky story. How does your mind work?

I enjoyedit very much. It's not so long for a good read.

Lori said...

You had me captivated and yes gave me chills now and then. You are an endless fountain of creativity Brian. :) Happy weekend!

adeeyoyo said...

Wow, Brian, not a shiver or two - I have gooseflesh all over! An absolutely brilliant tale, well-told!

Me said...

Oohh! Loved this! And a nice connect with the auburn eyes, stranger to child. Shivers all around, indeed!

I was a wee bit miffed by the "middle aged" label for someone in their thirties, though . I'm 37 and certainly still barely out of childhood!! Guess the sand in my hourglass is going just a bit too quickly for my liking as well, hmmm? :)
-C

Annie said...

Eerie and unsettling but filled with truth. Most women would do anything, sacrifice anything to save their child. Her lack of regret comes as no surprise. Very engaging story.

TechnoBabe said...

A life for a life. Makes me wonder why she was picked and approached in the first place. A story is not just what is written, there are questions and suggestions and emotions caused by reading something interesting. And this was great.

The Bug said...

You really are a master story teller. Poor Jacob, growing up without a mother. Since I never wanted kids I would have just gotten my tubes tied & then opened the box to see what was what. Wonder what would happen? Heh.

Reflections said...

Great story , and definitely not too long. Had me drawn totally in to your story. And yes, most mothers would exchange a life for a life.

Like the mystique of the stranger with the present.

Tracy said...

Wow that was really a nice read! Very suspenseful, Brian. You had me at "Tracing a creased finger along the lower bulb of the hourglass,". Now, can we talk about 30s being middle aged? Crikey. LOL.

Ed Pilolla said...

this was captivating! my sister called when i was in the middle of it and i couldn't help but get off the phone as quick as possible to finish. first, i love that she thought the guy with the prophecy was middle age, in his 30s. ha! and i so dig the whole life for a life. i mean, we've all heard that expression, right? when one is born, someone dies. this is a great tale based on our belief of that legend, at least that's how i unwrapped it. terrific, and a touch dark, as you do so damn well.

Teresa said...

What a touching story. What mother wouldn't sacrifice everything for her baby? Sad and well-written.

Bloggin'withAmanda said...

OMG you got all this from one picture? Amazing! Gosh I wish I could write like this! I was totally engaged, the ending is so sad!

Susan Deborah said...

My God! A long one but quite engrossing. You know where to give the shocks. Tight read!

Joy always,
Susan

Helen said...

Brian, the gift of your Magpie is worth every minute it took to read. I read it slowly, savoring each word.

she said...

that was some tale! Where the heck do you find the time to write? seriously! great, suspenseful story. I enjoyed even its bitter sweet ending.

TALON said...

I'm going to look forward to enjoying this with my morning coffee, Brian.

kathi harris said...

Thirty-smthing is not middle aged.

I luv the story. I am always wary of seemingly great offers from strangers. Sorry she had 2 die.

BLOGitse said...

a shiver or two,
no, more...wow.
i'm wordless...

ninotaziz said...

A modern day evil Rumplestiltskin! Sent shivers down my spine. Lovely read for a lazy Saturday afternoon.

Valerie said...

It didn't feel like a long read ... I was too engrossed. But shivers? Yes, there were plenty of those at the end. I expect one day to see this portrayed on television.

Cheryl said...

Rod Serling would have been proud to meet you.

Zuzana said...

Oh my goodness, I was holding my breath the whole time...
This was so suspenseful, dramatic and sad at the same time... Excellent writing, shows that you do so well no matter whether the story is short or long.;)
I am wishing you a much less dramatic weekend, enjoy your Saturday dear Brian,
xoxo

slommler said...

Oh how sad! And my stomach is still in knots! How awful for her and for James and the baby. They will miss out on having her in their life. Sigh! Sniff!! Oh my poor stomach!!
Hugs
SueAnn

Arts Web Show said...

Wow, this is a beautiful story.
A bit tragic but a very good read

tony said...

Had She Known The Outcome, I Suspect She Would Still Have Gone Ahead With The Pact.

the walking man said...

There was no bargain or agreement. The box was thrust upon her and conditions were set before she agreed to anything. Simply because she kept the box without knowing what was in it especially the note detailing a life for a life did not constitute a pact.

That aside I liked the story as a well told tale. If it was me I would have lost the box within a month and *shrug* destiny would be what it would be. I lose stuff a lot.

Brian Miller said...

first, thank you...i honestly am a bit surpised as i thought the length might kill this one...its ben a while since i have gone dark...

she...some days it comes easy others not so much...i keep my journal with me though to write as i can or as it comes to me...on days that is comes i go ahead and put it in so i carry a little bit of a backlog of posts for days when it does not come...

Deborah said...

Oooh... that kept me gripped, auburn eyed child ... ooh again, brilliant!

Claudia said...

i was on my way upstairs - and checked out your poem on my iphone.. while walking…and couldn't stop reading…standing in the middle of this stair…gripped by the words and realized only afterwards how loooooooong it was…
you should write a book - but i wouldn't buy it of course - otherwise i had no time to eat and drink and would be starved by the time i finished it...

Sezaaay said...

i felt awfully bad for this innocent woman. Great writing and what an interesting and creative idea! :)

Vicki Lane said...

Oh, my! What a stunner! A life for a life...

Just Be Real said...

Excellent Brian. Kept my interest. Blessings.

Birdie said...

Brian!! this is the most amazing magpie I read from you! Yes, it gave me chills!!! Yes, me too, I would open the box to safe my child ... Where can our imagination and beliefs take us though, isn't it? If she would have not believe it, she may have not 'attracted' the spell on her neither ... a brilliant one really!

Little Ms Blogger said...

What a great story and so sad and frustrating.

This was definitely worth the read. But, I'm curious, why did the man pick her.

Lorraine said...

I totally forgot you, found myself in a novel of mystery and terror...wow you had me Brian

Pauline said...

What on earth did you eat before going to bed? That's what my mother would have asked me if I'd told this tale. Aside from the horror of thinking middle age is somewhere around 30, you had me from the word tracing.

Lyn said...

Here comes Rosemary's Baby again..little devil, isn't he? Chilling....

Mighty M said...

Sounds like a great episode for the Twilight Zone. I loved reading it!

Nessa said...

It's how life goes - on fast forward. We must take heed.

little hat said...

Great story brian. Liked the way it ends leaving the reader with a challenge (for me at least) to reflect on the puzzle of life and death. That value we place on it. The assumptions we make. The neverending cycle. Well done.

Cindybrown said...

WOW!! Excellent story. You had my attention from the very beginning. It did give me a shiver. It is oh so true, we would give up our life to give our children life in a heartbeat. Wonderful as laways Brian.

Gabriela Abalo said...

What a great short story! I couldn't stop reading!!

Awesome!

Cindybrown said...

I meant ALWAYS :)

annell said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
annell said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
annell said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
annell said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
annell said...

I want her to awaken from that dream. Once not long after my son was born, I dreamed I left him on a bus. It was horrifying in my dream. And there were others, but how wonderful to wake and find it was only a dream. I think it had to do with the apprehension of wanting to be a good mother, and all the responsibility that would take. Parenting is a big job, and probably causes many a nightmare, as well as sleepless nights. And with all that worry, we can only do the best we can.

Come into the light, Brian......it's scary in the dark......BOO!

annell said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
annell said...

Just one more word, I was reading the comments and saw someone was a wee bit miffed, by the reference to someone so young as middle aged.

The other night I was watching "Curb Your Enthusiasm"and Larry referred to himself and his aging friends as middle aged. And I noticed, and I wondered?

I've decided people think middle age is the age they are. I'm not sure, and it is hard to accept, I am old, but I think it must be so, although my Mother is older than I am. So maybe if our parents are still living, we continue to think of ourselves as middle age?

Laura said...

This is so good! You had me with every word.

annell said...

Sorry Brian, I must have clicked too many times. Perhaps a little nervous after your scary story.

TALON said...

Oh! This was good, Brian. The pacing and the tension throughout, and the mystery of the auburn-eyed man, so well done. I have to admit that I'm worried about James and auburn-eyed Jacob now having a visit from the auburn-eyed man... I love when a story leaves me pondering.

Brian Miller said...

ok, i guess in the diting i will drop the middle aged thirty something reference...though i was imagining it through her eyes as a sophomore in college female...when 30+ seems so far away...but i wont justify....lol. or maybe as someone subtley suggested i was feeling a little middle aged...lol.

Brian Miller said...

here is another subtle though...what if the auburn eyed baby is the man at the beginning...who himself has to make a choice much like his mom only he chooses to live and let her...i know, twisted mind...

Bossy Betty said...

More than just a shiver or two!

CM said...

Oooh, very freaky! Sad and a bit heart wrenching too.

I like reading longer pieces sometimes...lets you really play out the characters. Awesome!

Shrinky said...

Whaaaaaaa-? That's not right, how can that be fair?? Ooooh, you stinker, you - I feel terrible for that poor woman, now!

Sometimes you write TOO well, my friend (wink).

Elizabeth said...

More than one shiver, much more than two. Incredibly powerful read. One must stay with it or wonder through days of not knowing, which echoes the story itself. This is fantastic Brian and so well written,

Elizabeth

natalee said...

Oh MY .... I have to be honest I would have given my life w/o any hesitation for my kids.. a mothers love... ps the box thing was sooo good and creepy...loved it!!!

n. davis rosback said...

Hi Brian!

are ya having a good saturday?
i hope so!

ladyfi said...

Oh goodness, this gave me lots of shivers! So deliciously spine-chilling and exciting.

Madame DeFarge said...

Definitely worth it and a very clever, very moving story of maternal love.

kathew said...

your story was wonderful- sad but, oh so well written and I could visualize Barbara aging- Mothers sacrifice themselves for their children- this was the ultimate sacrifice. Great Magpie

Sam Liu said...

This is a lot like Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray", but in reverse. It works beautifully. The narrative is fluid and easily readable, the emotions and images and scenes conjured are so vivid. And the subject you raise is a poignant and powerful one...the nature of time, the price of existence. A mysterious and excellent magpie, Brian.

kkrige said...

"She wonders what he will think, finding her here, a leaf whithered in the fall"

I love this metaphor Brian. And as you said, the story just pours out of you and you have to respect that, regardless of length. An interesting tale with a supernatural spin. Cool.

Who Is Afraid of Alfred Hitchcock? said...

Hi! Brian...
That was a very interesting story...it held my interest
until the end. I have to second the notion of the previous commenter(s)
and say that it was a very sad story.(A life for a life...)

Brian said,"it's a long one, i know...
Oh! No, I think the length was just right in order for you to tell the "eerie" tale.

thanks for reading.
You're very welcome!

hopefully you enjoyed it, or at least it gave you a shiver or two.
I would say 4 shivers and a half stars.

Thanks, for sharing!
DeeDee ;-D

Miss Nikki said...

This story was wonderful, not lengthy at all, every word had it's place... Great imagination, greatly written, I want more of your stories!

william said...

brrrrrrrr that was chilling, very long and well worth the read ;)

Rene/ Not The Rockefellers said...

Brian, this was wonderful, and so sad...
very "Twilight Zone"
amazing storytelling

Rene

Tina said...

LOVED this. And ironically, I'm reading Stephen King's "On Writing"...This story is a spectacular write, with lots of unanswered questions. As it should be. "Always leave them wanting more." I think Stephen would be proud.

JeffScape said...

Detect a bit of Richard Matheson here...

This is engaging and definitely more ambitious than anything I've read at Waystation One. It's nice to see genesis of a slower technique. There's palpable build and it's showing a bit.

Rewrite this. Make it longer. ;)

Tumblewords: said...

Chilling. A good read!

Captain Dumbass said...

What Tina said, a couple above me. Not that I'm reading "On Writing," but I have read it and agree. Short and sweet. Well, sweet in a dark chocolate kind of way.

Jen said...

I was hoping when she turned it upside down she'd get younger.

She Writes said...

That could be a book.

Teri said...

How you can come up with these time after time is beyond me, Brian! I would gladly trade my life for that of my child...any day! I bet you would too!

Karen S said...

Yikes! Children do drain the life out of a parent -- but the rewards are huge. Great read.

Maha said...

you wrote a long story but there was not the least need to worry. you made it very exciting, very gripping one couldn't miss a word in it. I like how you kept on complicating it leaving the readers dying to know what will happen next. there's a teeny weeny little thing though, in the third paragraph, the word "table" was mentioned three times.

tattytiara said...

Wow sad. Definitely kept the suspense taut.

The Silver Fox said...

Very nicely done! Wonder if Barbara would have remained free of regrets had it been James' life that was so threatened by the hourglass.

lettuce said...

oh nooooooooooooooooooo!

how could you?! very nicely done, really compelling - definately twilight zone

chiccoreal said...

Dear Brian: The images so clear as this well-written tale conveys the inevitability of time. "

"a leaf whithered in the fall, watching over their child. Jacob, their beautiful auburn eyed child."

There are so many references and symbolisms, etc., that enrich this piece de resistance. There really is nothing we can do about time but suffer it's wholly unfair consequences. Thought-provoking and creepy; but that is what happens sometimes in a horror-genre tale. Hoping no one ever has to suffer the fate of such as these. In a way, we all do at one time or other when we lose our loved ones. Heart-wrenching! Excellent!

Susannah said...

What a wonderful Magpie, I loved your chilling tale1

Joseph Pulikotil said...

Hello Brian:)

This is a hair raising spooky story beautifully conceived and well written to keep the readers engrossed and riveted right from the beginning to the end.

Well, when I really thought about it, I felt that this whole thing could have been the dream of a stressed mind of Barbara. Or it could be a story told by you to your children when they asked you to tell them a story.I used to tell such stories to my children mainly about ghosts just to keep them away from doing mischief in the house.

But your story is fantastic and I read it completely engrossed and I didn't feel it was long.I enjoyed it immensely. A wonderful creation of a fertile mind.

Best wishes:)
Joseph

The Crusty Crone said...

A real page turner!! I thought for sure that James was a goner... but noooo. Surprise!

I hate those life-for-a-life things. Ya just know no good will come of it.

Thoroughly enjoyed it!

CatLadyLarew said...

Now, that was wonderfully eerie! I'll be thinking about this one for a long time, Brian!

steviewren said...

Brian, this is your best Magpie yet! Have you ever tried to sell your work? You really took the prompt and ran with it! Bravo!

PattiKen said...

Wow. Have you been eating spicy food late at night?

It was a captivating read. I did get a bit hung up on the "middle aged" in his thirties(!) thing, but I got past it. ;-)

Kristen Haskell said...

Oh, here I am reading along and things are starting to get a little tense and then bam you hit me with a life for a life. I keep reading because I am HOOKED! Then the ending comes and I am devastated by the chilly ending. Now I have to go put on sweater and it is 90 here today in Missouri. Great job Brian!

only a movie said...

Crazy!!!

:-)

Sophia said...

What a SUPER twist! Oooooweeeeee! You are one oober super duper writer, Brian. Remind me not to get stuck in a room all alone in the dark with you!! haha :)~

Priyanka Bhowmick said...

such a beautiful story.. lovely magpie

Goofball said...

creepy

Raven said...

I was riveted throughout this story! It is amazing. So well crafted and suspenseful!

Abhilasha-The Desire said...

This was an absolutely fab story brian...Beyond imagination and truly enjoying...Believe me it haunted me the night i read it... Very very impressive.. Thanks

willow said...

Wow, creepy read, Brian! (I love when you use capitals. Makes the read sooo much easier!) ;^)

Linda said...

That was a great story. Kept me going until the end. I would not have chosen to open the tube, knowing that someone's life, perhaps mine, would be taken. There again, I am not a mother. Keep 'em coming.

Lydia said...

Your muse is alive and well (and sometimes creepy and scary too).
While on the subject of parents saving unborn child's life, did you see this poignant story last week?
http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/39146785/ns/today-today_people/

Jennifer said...

Crikey - that one's a "page turner" Brian. And it asks some of those questions we sometimes hate to ponder...

deb said...

fabulous.
I saved it, for the length,
and I'm glad I did. fabulous.
and I agree with an earlier comment re Twilight Zone.
shivers indeed

Jim Swindle said...

Eerie, well-written.

Magpie said...

What a twisted little tale. Especially your comment about this possibly being the end of the son having to make a choice. Spooky!

ms pie said...

so glad to have stopped by... loved it!!!

Patience said...

enjoyed this one tons and it def. gave me a shiver or two...especially since i have lived in Charlottesville, Va for the past five years, my husband goes to UVA and I study studio art. Ahhh! What made you pick C'ville of all places?

Marla said...

Stephen King is your father. Admit it!!

Syd said...

Like a Dorian Gray only much sadder.

Anonymous said...

Nice dispatch and this post helped me alot in my college assignement. Gratefulness you seeking your information.

mama-face said...

how do you know so much about the workings of a woman's mind and the invisible thread that binds her to her child from the instant she finds out she is pregnant...the pain of losing that child before it is born. what a woman will do to keep from having a miscarriage...i know that feeling. (i also love that you apologize in a comment on the length of the post. so you. no worries...sometimes you just have to add the details to convey the emotion and sometimes it comes in a few words. I know this from reading; not from writing. :) )

OJ Gonzalez-Cazares said...

wow... my best friend told me to read this one (I read your latest magpie) and she was right! this is amazing! Have you seen the movie "The Box"? it's based on a short story that I am sure you will find interesting... (nothing is for free in this life...)