Tuesday, August 17, 2010

beyond the see

under the leaf laden arms of trees,
by the long iron lane of the railroad track,
river rolling in the background,
providing gentle music
against the rocks,
he sits
on a three-legged wooden stool,
before a paint dappled easel,
swaying gently as he
creates,
colors here and there,
until he births a
majestic scene,
even more beautiful
than what lay before him
(or me),
of the the city rising, as fingers reaching
to touch the sky,
by the banks of serenity &
i can't help but ask him
how he does it, only to find
he has no eyes, &
replies, "i just ask
others who stop
by what they
see"...and
then he
asks
me...
"what do you see?"

& the scales
fall away from my eyes, as a
sandy haired
blind man
teaches me
to see again.

This is for One Shot Wednesday. No theme, just poetry. Write a poem & come join us.

or perhaps you like some imperfect prose...

132 comments:

CM said...

Beautiful. Simply beautiful.

Boonsong said...

This is very mystical, and has such visual form too. Very deep. You've rather excelled yourself with this. Thanks.

All the best, Boonsong

signed...bkm said...

reminds me of the real blind painter in europe who paints by feel...we all need to be shown how to see again and again...nice..bkm

Travel & Dive Girl said...

I can't imagine life without sight. Thanks again Brian for this beautiful piece.

Chocolate Covered Daydreams said...

Would you just stop it already with the beautiful words! LOL Okay, you're enticing me to write again...I hear it taunting me through your words. Loved this one!

Maggie said...

I love the imagery this poem brings out!

Brian Miller said...

this is probably the second or third poem i have written about blind artists that i have run into...i am just drawn to them...probably becuase i rely so heavily on my senses...to see one with out that is about to create such beauty...

TALON said...

Beautiful, Brian. And I love that he asks others what they see...that's so touching. This reminds me of Esref Armagan, a turkish painter who was born blind. Amazing what he saw with his other senses and put onto canvas.

Shannon Tucker Photography said...

your words create vision for those you can't see.....

S

Daniel said...

Many of us have eyes but do not see. Oh to have the scales fall away.

Steven Anthony said...

such a way you have of painting a picture, opening my eyes..


Steven Anthony
Man Dish~Metro Style

Susan Deborah said...

This was a beautiful one. I cannot but help think of Gloucester "King Lear," who becomes blind in the play. Some lines from him:

I have no way and therefore want no eyes;
I stumbled when I saw.
Full oft 'tis seen,
Our means secure us, and our mere defects
Prove our commodities.

I have never seen a blind artist. This reading was a wonderful experience recounted to me.

Thanks dear Brian.

Joy always,
Susan

Eva Gallant said...

I love to read whatever you write, but it always makes me feel so inadequate to be tapping the keyboard with my unskilled fingers, trying to draw worthy words from the abyss that is my mind.

mairmusic said...

Cool lesson! There always seems to be one in your verse. how is the book coming? I'll be in for Oneshot tomorrow, as my poems are always posted between Wednesday and Thursday. it's a funny one this week, so hope you can stop back & read it.
http://mairmusic.wordpress.com/

drybottomgirl said...

Wow! To see what other's see is magical. We just have to open our minds in order to open our eyes....beautiful!

pink dogwood said...

This is beautiful - glad to have found your blog :)

deb said...

oh, Brian
humbled.

thank you for sharing beauty and wisdom and grace the way you do.

Tracy said...

That is so cool, Brian. I don't know how you continue to amaze me with your writing talent, but you do!

Meeko Fabulous said...

That was just beautiful. Awesome.

Monkey Man said...

Ironically, it is the visuals in this poem that I like.

adeeyoyo said...

Brian, I am all out of words... I can only think you are inspired...

SuziCate said...

Such beauty in your words. Brian you never disappoint. This, I think, is now my favorite of yours.

adeeyoyo said...

... and to think that someone without sight can 'see' more clearly than the rest of us...

slsdreamer said...

This is so beautifully written as are all your other pieces that I've just read. I came to your blog simply to thank you for commenting on my haikus and was captivated by your writing. I'm so happy I discovered your blog! Thank you!

natalee said...

I love this... the blind man teaching you to see... powerful my friend..powerful

JStar said...

Oh I love this Brian...So brilliantly written...Your tatics and issues, leave me in suspense. I never know whats going to come out of your head :)

lakeviewer said...

What we learn when we are forced to see! You captured this well, B.and what an apt title!

5thsister said...

plein aire...

a beautifully satisfying poem, Brian. Should we all let our blindedness go! I am hoping to soon be able to see beyond the veil of my own.

TechnoBabe said...

This is one of my very favorite posts on your blog, I love this story.

Ed Pilolla said...

sandy haired blind man. now that's placement of detail. man, this is an efficient piece.

yeah, i'm done working that crazy job. just not for me. i guess being poor is what's for me, unfortunately:)

this piece reads like a parable. it's great.

Kavita said...

wow..what a story, Brian!! Mysterious and intriguing!!! Am still wondering about that man...
Those moments after we gain consciousness...those first few moments are really quite unnerving! You see so images.. whether they are for real, or just in you head, you never really know!
An awesome read, B!

Claudia said...

oh wow brian - this one touched - heavily!
...he births a majestic scene...think you birthed a breath taking poem...

william said...

blindness can only impair what your mind already sees, and this was superb :)

Valerie said...

This is so beautiful. I never stop being grateful for having all my senses, and I never stop admiring those who have lost one. Thanks, Brian, your words gave me food for thought.

DJan said...

I learned long ago that seeing doesn't come from the visual cortex. One of my favorite quotes is "Imagination is the star in man."

Cheryl said...

and the scales fall away...

Ayuh, that there is some mighty fine writin'

Becky said...

I love it Brian, awesome!

Everyday Goddess said...

incredible! I have never met a blind artist.

what did the little prince say, what is truly important is invisible to the eye?

anthonynorth said...

What an excellent ending.

ladynimue said...

i almost wait for a chance to read you !! happy atleast am regular with One shot wednesday !! loved this .. love everything you write :)

blueviolet said...

Maybe our vision is a distraction to letting what we have inside come out.

dustus said...

Brian, you write so vividly with excellent descriptions. Great lyrical storytelling in this one too. cheers

lukepraterswordsalad said...

you really are a good poet. On e of the best on the scene, man.

Take it easy

Luke

Bill Cook said...

Makes me wonder what I am looking at, but don't see. Thanks for this. - Bill

Desert Rose said...

love it Brian..simple and hits right in..:)

sage said...

Wow, a nice poem and a great truth

Kay said...

and i wonder... what you replied???

for I would see nothing other than a marvelous man...

would you let him know?

Sam Liu said...

This is one of the best of yours I've read, Brian. Timelessly beautiful, and so very poignant. The scenes and the philosophy are breathtaking and so refreshing. Indeed, so many of us need help to see the world.

Carolina Linthead said...

Oh my. This is so very beautiful. The story you tell is touching and inspirational, as so many have noted, but please know that your poem is a work of art, as well, carrying us to that moment with simple, confident strokes.

Bossy Betty said...

Gorgeous. I wanna see like that.

Mighty M said...

Just amazing! Some people are so talented and you and that painter are two of them!! :)

moondustwriter said...

the things we learn from the simple will far outweigh the things we learn from the arrogant, proud, and supposedly wise

Thanks for shedding light and color today on One Shot

moon smiles my friend

J. said...

A sobering lesson indeed. As usual, an excellent piece!

Cinner said...

Brian, this is beautiful, I could feel myself sitting on that bench, it is funny that our posts had lots in common today. I have learned a lot from an elderly blind man named Arnie. He could see more than most of us. He went to Holland all by himself, nothing kept him from doing anything.Have a great day.

Tina said...

As I read this, it brought to mind one of my favorite movies, filmed on location in New Orleans called "A Love Song for Bobby Long". There are several scenes with the Mississippi in the background..that's what you made me see. Loved this.

Betsy said...

I have a blind friend that plays the piano...it's just amazing to watch..and listen!

Steven Marty Grant said...

I always love a good biblical allusion and yours is a perfect fit in this piece

Who Is Afraid of Alfred Hitchcock? said...

Hi! Brian...
Once again, you have written a poem that is very thought-provoking.

I sometimes wonder if your readers' comments or feedback serves as inspiration when you write your poetry?

Thanks, for sharing!
DeeDee ;-D

sweetmango said...

oh wow that was beautiful.
it is how artists try to look at their work too. blind and using other senses to create the imagery.
very cool B
xxm

Candie Bracci said...

Truely beautiful Brian!

Kira Stann said...

This is a wonderful poem of self enlightenment. I could really relate to it. Thank you!

Brian Miller said...

great question deedee...first off i read and cherish every comment...i think that is why i have yet to write the book..instnat gratification and all...smiles.

yes, they do...and others posts as well...i love to hear peoples stories which is why i try to give you something to htink about or create all the detail of a situation...to see how you respond or what thoughts it pulls...

Unknown Mami said...

Fantastic and inspiring.

Liza said...

And again I ask,
where is the tissue button???

"a majestic scene"
in my mind.

Nancy said...

Very simple, yet very complex. Very nice.

Neva Flores said...

Wonderful words..........

Wild Rose said...

Wow this a great one Brian, i feel bad that he can't see but he's so comfortable asking people to see for him that it makes you feel like he doesn't mind his situation of being blind at all. Thanks for sharing with Oneshot.

G-Man said...

Damn It you little Geek...
You just gave me a HUGE Shiver running up and down my spine!!
No Offense....

Prayer Girl said...

I yearn for those brief moments when the scales fall away from my eyes. Those times are like a miracle of rebirth.

Beautiful poem, Brian.

PG

kkrige said...

Gonna jump on board and say this was beautiful Brian. You had me swaying with you and smiling along the way. I always love how you give everyone insight, pointing out our limited vision at times.

r3m3mb3rm3 said...

that is beautiful
):)(:(

Stranger said...

You paint with words, creating these worlds that you do not see. You are a blind painter too. So beautiful. Profound! When I grow up, I hope to write as well as you. :)

Smart Mouth Broad said...

You are always so thought-provoking. Great stuff, Brian.

Magpie said...

"until he births a majestic scence"...what a line. Wonderful. There are so many ways to "see" things if we are just open to them.

emily wierenga said...

oh, i love this. i love learning to see. your posts help me with this. yes. please link this to imperfect prose... i will be hosting it later than usual, but i still plan to host it this week. bless you.

Bridgette said...

Love it!

Deidra said...

You see real good, Brian.

I could hear music while I read this. A guitar gently strumming. You write music here!

Tony Single said...

Yes, thanks for showing us what you see, Brian. That blind man sure ain't no fool. :)

Katherine said...

Yes I think we do tend to walk around with our blinkers on & fail to see the beauty that surrounds us. This was really lovely Brian!

Ladyulia said...

would u explain to me whats the meaning of that?
I dont really understand since my english is not really good :D

she said...

This may have already been said but I don't have time to read all 79 comments (Holy Moly!) but I learn so much from those who do more with less. Lovely story, Brian. Thank you for sharing it with us.

John's comments said...

I was struck by it reminding me of the Raymond Carver story, Cathedral. How we see is always a powerful theme for a poem and as the poem suggests to see is more then visual observation. Thanks for dropping by. I’m continuing with poems using adapted formal structures. This one is a Sestina about a cold hearted seducer and its called I’m the beast that you fear, in the shadows of night

Pete Marshall said...

wow bri...i made a point of getting my wife to sit down and read this also...you set the scene so well, i live by the coast and often come across a painter and i always love watching them work..but then you spun it!..so well crafted my friend..cheers pete

slommler said...

Beautiful Brian!!! And as you say...we all need to learn to "see"!
Thanks for the reminder.
Hugs
SueAnn

Gwei Mui said...

Inspired you do not need eyes to see, ears to hear or a tongue to speak. In fact very often we don't see, we don't hear and we don't speak even when we have the facility to do so.

Vita Wright said...

This is a great poem, I like the sense of space that is created. Nice one!

Birdie said...

sigh. beautiful... so very beautiful! happy day Brian!

sheila said...

Oh my! THis is very beautiful!

riikainfinityy.com said...

we don't need eyes to see the world, what we really need is a heart that never stop believing and overcome obstacles :D

A Daft Scots Lass said...

moving and inspiring.

BLOGitse said...

Clever and beautiful!

Beachanny said...

Wow, you take imagistic poetry to new heights. You build the scene with the layout and then you let the words create an even more vivid picture in the reader's mind. I am not sure what you do is strictly poetry. I would truly call you a painter of words. Excellent. Thank you.

Vicki Lane said...

Lovely images and flow!

Vicki Lane said...

Lovely images and flow!

Teresa said...

So pastoral at the beginning and then to think of the artist being blind. How cool.

PattiKen said...

See, that's the problem with being #96. So I'll just say this: What they said. Especially Tracy. You continue to amaze me.

Glynn said...

I love this poem, Brian. And who is the sandy-haired man?

Help! Mama Remote... said...

Brian, that's a life lesson!

Mona said...

there sure is a difference between looking and seeing...

that challenge sounds like fun...

Tom said...

i like this one. wraps up nicely

Marcus Goodyear said...

100 comments? How do you do it, man?

In the poem, I like the way you play with internal rhyme. My favorite rhyme pair was "eyes" and "replies."

ChristeeneFraser said...

This is so beautiful, very lyrical. I love the way the you move from describing someone external then make it personal "(or me?)." I think good poets make us do the same thing with their words. Thanks for the comments on my poem as well!

annell said...

Really nice. Thank you.

ModernMom said...

You painted a beautiful picture:)

deadpoet88 said...

Wow this is beautiful! Often it takes a blind man to make us see life as it is. Great poem, very insightful!

ethelmaepotter! said...

I...

I'm speechless.

You never fail to amaze me. You're a strong young man, full of life; you're a woman, struggling with emotion and insecurity; you're a child, you're an old man, you're blind...

My grandmother used to say we never really know someone until we've put on his shoes and walked around in them. YOU, Brian, seem to do this week after week. You not only put on those shoes, you crawl into that skin and feel everything your characters do.

I am simply overwhelmed by this post. This is another I'm saving to my favorites. In fact, I need to start a new folder, because your posts are quickly filling my "favorites!"

The Girl from Cherry Blossom Street said...

We don't see what they see.
We never will....

joanny said...

Superb Brian, one of your best, and you have written quite a few stunners, this is great.

Joanny

suja said...

Simple pleasures! Nice...

Kavita said...

This one gave me goosebumps, Bri...
An amazing read! I really believe that the blind can "See" better than we do! Cuz they see with their hearts and souls..whereas we just look with our eyes, and never bother to really see...

I really loved the last few lines where you say that the scales are lifted off your eyes, and you are now taught to see again... I think that really drilled it in!!! This was lovely.. phheeww!!!

The Retired One said...

Brian: this one was especially touching..and a great reminder that most of us gifted with sight are the ones who are really blind.

lifeloveandmisery said...

just beautiful... touching... thank you

Bethany Ann said...

at first, i actually wondered if this was a pretty poem about an imaginary artist. i can't even stick a plug into an outlet in the dark.

Marla said...

Love it, B ~

Heather said...

whoa. is about all I can muster.
thanks, for the humility in asking another for the answers... and thanks for sharing it.
peace.

JoAnn said...

I love that it's by a rail road track. I mean, could there be a more exciting, industrial, dangerous, adventurous, noisy quiet place?

Stopping by from imperfect prose.

Shauna said...

love it. may we all relearn how to see the world that has been gifted to us. thank you for this poignant reminder. well said.

keLi said...

this is one of those lessons i need to learn over and over again ... so visceral.

Nancy said...

Stopped over from emily's place at imperfect prose. "See" is my word for this year. I so appreciate this.

emily wierenga said...

i'm so glad you linked up today, brian. peace to you, writer-brother.

Graceful said...

You may not see this comment because you have 50 million (okay 120, but same difference), but I just wanted to say, this is my first time here, and I love, love your poem. I will be back. Yes I will.

gospelwriter said...

we learn to see from most unexpected sources - my mom, who was sighted till about ten years ago, can still surprise me with a detailed description of where in the world I'll find some foreign country or city (never was that good with maps myself)

Your poem is powerful!

Jenny said...

Brian, thanks for your encouragement on my imperfect prose and for sharing yours with me.

Goofball said...

wow for real?

J said...

of the city rising, as fingers reaching
to touch the sky...

extraordinary piece of work. Blessed me. Thank you!

Teresa Evangeline said...

Brian, thank you for visiting and leaving your kind comment on my POTW, "Squash Blossoms and Hope." I'm glad you enjoyed reading it.

faery of the wilds said...

sometimes most of us dont see half of the things around us... nice work

Nessa said...

You have given me an idea.

Hoiden said...

one word...fantastic
:)

Dianne said...

nice job, and I like your other darker work, too. the blind painter is hard to fathom, though when we write about others, we are really writing blind, aren't we?
have a good week.
You have a wonderful eye.
Dianne

Mmm said...

Another compelling post. you always make us think, Brian. Kudos.

Syd said...

It is amazing what we can see when we really look.